You have free access to this content

Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 5

May 2012

Volume 241, Issue 5

Pages 831–1019

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy elucidates details on mouse ear development

      Benjamin Kopecky, Shane Johnson, Heather Schmitz, Peter Santi and Bernd Fritzsch

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23793

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23772

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23792

  4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      New frontiers in cell competition (pages 831–841)

      Simon de Beco, Marcello Ziosi and Laura A. Johnston

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23783

  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Immunophenotypic characterization of enteric neural crest cells in the developing avian colorectum (pages 842–851)

      Nandor Nagy, Alan J. Burns and Allan M. Goldstein

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23767

      Key findings:

      • Undifferentiated ENCCs at the colorectal wavefront express HNK-1, N-cadherin, Sox10, p75, and L1CAM.

      • ENCCs colonize the colorectum in a rostrocaudal direction during embryonic days 6.5–8.0 and subsequently differentiate rostrocaudally into neurons and glia.

      • The results highlight a range of markers, including neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which can be used to label cells at the migration wavefront.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inhibitory morphogens and monopodial branching of the embryonic chicken lung (pages 852–862)

      Jason P. Gleghorn, Jiyong Kwak, Amira L. Pavlovich and Celeste M. Nelson

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23771

      Key findings:

      • Monopodial branching is not determined by autocrine morphogen gradients.

      • TGFβ1 and BMP4 differentially affect branching and growth of the airways.

      • Development of the airway epithelium obeys power-law dynamics.

      • Branch sites scale with the size of the organ.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Normalized shape and location of perturbed craniofacial structures in the Xenopus tadpole reveal an innate ability to achieve correct morphology (pages 863–878)

      Laura N. Vandenberg, Dany S. Adams and Michael Levin

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23770

      Key findings:

      • Craniofacial perturbations in the Xenopus tadpole become normalized over time.

      • The jaw and branchial arches achieve both normal position and morphology. Eyes, nose and otoliths achieve normal position but varying degrees of normal morphology.

      • Two parameters, distance from the brain and angle from the midline, define normal position of craniofacial structures. Perturbed structures eventually achieve normal values for these parameters even though they start from abnormal initial conditions.

      • These results shed light on the information processing and decision-making processes that underlie biological tissues' innate ability to repair deformities.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Incomplete splicing, cell division defects, and hematopoietic blockage in dhx8 mutant zebrafish (pages 879–889)

      Milton A. English, Lin Lei, Trevor Blake, Stephen M. Wincovitch Sr, Raman Sood, Mizuki Azuma, Dennis Hickstein and P. Paul Liu

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23774

      Key findings:

      • dhx8 mutant fish are embryonic lethal.

      • dhx8 mutant embryos have hematopoietic defects.

      • dhx8 mutant embryos have cell division defects.

      • dhx8 mutant embryos have RNA splicing defects.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Alterations in mast cell frequency and relationship to angiogenesis in the rat mammary gland during windows of physiologic tissue remodeling (pages 890–900)

      Robert A. Ramirez, Amy Lee, Pepper Schedin, Joshua S. Russell and Patricia A. Masso-Welch

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23778

      Key findings:

      • Mast cell abundance is up to ten-fold greater in the stroma surrounding ducts, compared to lobules; however, both structures show a peak at day 28 of age.

      • Mast cell frequency in the lobule is significantly increased during diestrus II, the regressive phase of the estrous cycle.

      • After peaking at day 2 of pregnancy, mast cell abundance declines steadily throughout pregnancy, but is rapidly restored to baseline levels in early post-lactational involution.

      • Capillary abundance is cyclic in the resting gland terminal ductal lobular unit, with a peak during metestrus, when limited secretory differentiation occurs.

      • Capillary abundance per lobular alveolus progressively increases throughout lactation, is maintained until day 2 of involution, progressively decreasing thereafter.

    6. You have free access to this content
      A Lissencephaly-1 homologue is essential for mitotic progression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (pages 901–910)

      Martis W. Cowles, Amy Hubert and Ricardo M. Zayas

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23775

      Key findings:

      • Lissencephaly-1 is required for stem cell maintenance in planarians.

      • Inhibition of Lissencephaly-1 leads to mitotic arrest and loss of the stem cell population.

      • Lissencephaly-1 regulates the function of the mitotic spindle apparatus.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Airway epithelial cell differentiation during lung organogenesis requires C/EBPα and C/EBPβ (pages 911–923)

      Abraham B. Roos, Tove Berg, Jenny L. Barton, Lukas Didon and Magnus Nord

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23773

      Key Findings:

      • Mice lacking C/EBPα and C/EBPβ in the lung epithelium display impaired airway epithelial cell differentiation.

      • Disruption of both Cebpa and Cebpb results in a more severe pulmonary phenotype than deletion of either gene alone.

      • C/EBPα and C/EBPβ play partially overlapping roles in regulating airway epithelial differentiation.

    8. You have free access to this content
      Specific inactivation of Twist1 in the mandibular arch neural crest cells affects the development of the ramus and reveals interactions with hand2 (pages 924–940)

      Yanping Zhang, Evan L. Blackwell, Mitchell T. McKnight, Gregory R. Knutsen, Wendy T. Vu and L. Bruno Ruest

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23776

      Key findings:

      • Twist1 regulates the development of the mandibular ramus.

      • Twist1 regulates molar development and cusp formation.

      • Mandibular hypoplasia causes cleft palate following a Pierre-Robin-like sequence.

      • Twist1 controls the ossification of the mandible with Hand2.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Cyclin D1 inactivation extends proliferation and alters histogenesis in the postnatal mouse retina (pages 941–952)

      Gaurav Das, Anna M. Clark and Edward M. Levine

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23782

      Key Findings:

      • Cyclin D1 is expressed in postnatal retinal progenitors.

      • Fewer RPCs in Cyclin D1−/− retina, but proliferation persists past the normal developmental period.

      • Cyclin D3 is precociously expressed in Cyclin D1−/− RPCs but doesn't compensate for loss of Cyclin D1.

      • Altered production of late-born retinal cell types in Cyclin D1−/− retina.

      • Developmental timing of retinal histogenesis depends on aspects of Cyclin D1 function that are not shared by other D-cyclins.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Lack of lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 in embryonic stem cells compromises neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth (pages 953–964)

      Roberto Sánchez-Sánchez, Sara L. Morales-Lázaro, José-Manuel Baizabal, Manjula Sunkara, Andrew J. Morris and Diana Escalante-Alcalde

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23779

      Key findings:

      • LPP3-deficiency reduces the amount of spinal neural precursors and neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells.

      • Absence of LPP3 decreases proliferation of neural precursors and increases apoptosis during the neural differentiation of embryoid bodies.

      • Lack of LPP3 expression stimulates the differentiation of smooth muscle actin-expressing cells in ES cells differentiated under neuralizing conditions.

      • Lack of LPP3 produces the accumulation of extracellular dihydro-S1P in embryoid bodies differentiated under neuralizing conditions.

      • Lack of LPP3 in in vitro differentiated spinal neurons affects neurite outgrowth through the activation of Rho and PI3K.

  6. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      A novel Cre/loxP system for mosaic gene expression in the Drosophila embryo (pages 965–974)

      Naotaka Nakazawa, Kiichiro Taniguchi, Takashi Okumura, Reo Maeda and Kenji Matsuno

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23784

      Key findings:

      • A new Cre/loxP system allows Gal4-dependent mosaic gene expression in various Drosophila tissues.

      • This method efficiently induces mosaic gene expression in most embryonic tissues, including the epidermis, amnioserosa, tracheal system, malpighian tubules, foregut, and midgut. However, it is inefficient in neuronal tissue and does not occur in the visceral muscles.

      • This method induces mosaic gene expression from embryonic stage 9.

  7. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Peri-implantation lethality in mice lacking the PGC-1-related coactivator protein (pages 975–983)

      Xin He, Chen Sun, Feng Wang, Aijing Shan, Ting Guo, Weiqiong Gu, Bin Cui and Guang Ning

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23769

      Key findings:

      • Disruption of pprc1 gene causes peri-implantation embryonic lethality. Developmental deficiencies in pprc1−/− embryos occur during peri-implantation.

      • In vitro culturing of pprc1−/− blastocysts is susceptible to growth retardation.

      • PPRC1 mRNA is expressed during preimplantation embryonic development.

      • PPRC1 mRNA is rapidly up-regulated during early embryoid body formation.

    2. You have free access to this content
      The expression profile of the tumor suppressor gene Lzts1 suggests a role in neuronal development (pages 984–994)

      Marlene Kropp and Sara I. Wilson

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23777

      Key findings:

      • The expression pattern of Lzts1 in mouse and chick spinal cord is similar but not identical suggesting a fundamental and conserved embryonic function.

      • Consistent with a potential role in cell cycle regulation/exit, Lzts1 mRNA is enriched in spinal neurons at the border of the ventricular and mantle zones.

      • Lzts1 protein is expressed in motor, commissural and dorsal root ganglia axons and soma during periods of axon path finding and soma migration.

      • Together, the profile of Lzts1 is consistent with a potential role(s) in cell cycle regulation, axon guidance, fasciculation, growth or neuronal migration.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Myogenic waves and myogenic programs during Xenopus embryonic myogenesis (pages 995–1007)

      Bruno Della Gaspera, Anne-Sophie Armand, Inés Sequeira, Albert Chesneau, André Mazabraud, Sylvie Lécolle, Frédéric Charbonnier and Christophe Chanoine

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23780

      Key findings:

      • The expression pattern of each myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) during embryonic development highlights three successive myogenic waves in Xenopus somites.

      • A first median and lateral myogenesis initiates before dermomyotome formation in Xenopus.

      • Xenopus craniofacial myogenesis is characterized by the presence of Myf5- or Myod-lineages.

    4. You have free access to this content
      EphB3 marks delaminating endocrine progenitor cells in the developing pancreas (pages 1008–1019)

      Alethia Villasenor, Leilani Marty-Santos, Christopher Dravis, Peter Fletcher, Mark Henkemeyer and Ondine Cleaver

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23781

      Key findings:

      • EphB3 is expressed in pancreatic pro-endocrine cells, but not mature hormone producing cells.

      • Detailed developmental expression pattern of EphB3 during first and secondary transition of pancreatic development suggest different differentiation rates.

      • Pulse-chase techniques using an EphB3rtTA BAC-transgenic mice establishes the timeframe for embryonic endocrine cell maturation: ∼2 days.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION