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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 241, Issue 7

Pages 1143–1237

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
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      A Lissencephaly-1 homologue is essential for mitotic progression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

      Martis W. Cowles, Amy Hubert and Ricardo M. Zayas

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23814

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23803

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23815

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Close association of olfactory placode precursors and cranial neural crest cells does not predestine cell mixing (pages 1143–1154)

      Maegan V. Harden, Luisa Pereiro, Mirana Ramialison, Jochen Wittbrodt, Megana K. Prasad, Andrew S. McCallion and Kathleen E. Whitlock

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23797

      Key findings:

      • The six4b:mCherry line expresses mCherry in the forming olfactory placodes.

      • mCherry expressing cells move caudally, away from the anterior midline, to form the olfactory placodes.

      • Sox10:GFP positive cranial neural crest cells migrate rostrally to surround the forming olfactory placodes.

      • Little cell-mixing is observed during the migation of Six4b:mCherry and Sox10:GFP expressing cells.

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      Antagonistic activities of Rho and Rac GTPases underlie the transition from neural crest delamination to migration (pages 1155–1168)

      Irit Shoval and Chaya Kalcheim

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23799

      Key findings:

      • Neural crest progenitors selectively express Rho in epithelial and Rac1 in migratory mesenchymal progenitors.

      • Rac1 function is necessary for neural crest migration in vivo and in explants but not for initial cell delamination from the neural tube.

      • Inhibition of Rho/Rock activity stimulates lamellipodia formation and neural crest migration through activation of Rac1.

      • Transient inhibition of Rac1 function in vivo can be used as a tool to control the timing of neural crest dispersion in the embryo.

      • Early emigrating neural crest cells whose dispersion is transiently delayed in vivo still home to original sites where they adopt neural fates.

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      Multi-Layered hypertrophied MEE formation by microtubule disruption via GEF-H1/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway (pages 1169–1182)

      Yukiko Kitase and Charles F. Shuler

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23800

      Key findings:

      • Microtubule disassembly causes failure of palatal fusion due to multi-layered hypertrophied MEE formation in the middle region of the palatal shelves.

      • Nocodazole activates RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway and stress fiber formation in MEE

      • Multi-layered hypertrophied MEE formation is not dependent on TGF-β/Smad signaling.

      • GEF-H1/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway is involved in multi-layred hypertrophied MEE formation.

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      Lineage tracing of the endoderm during oral development (pages 1183–1191)

      Michaela Rothova, Hannah Thompson, Heiko Lickert and Abigail S. Tucker

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23804

      Key findings:

      • The epithelium of murine teeth is derived from the ectoderm.

      • The epithelium of the major salivary glands is derived from the ectoderm.

      • A V-shaped border at the base of the tongue separates the ectoderm- and endoderm-derived tissue.

      • The minor mucous salivary glands of the tongue, circumvallate papillae, and foliate papillae are derived from endoderm.

  5. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Transgenic mouse analysis of Sry expression during the pre- and peri-implantation stage (pages 1192–1204)

      David W. Silversides, Diana L. Raiwet, Ouliana Souchkova, Robert S. Viger and Nicolas Pilon

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23798

      Key findings:

      • The proximal promoter of SRY/Sry from several mammalian species (pig, human and mouse) directs reporter gene expression in the epiblast of pre- and peri-implantation mouse embryos.

      • Expression levels of SRY/Sry reporters coincide with the maturation stage of pre- and peri-implantation embryos, being positively correlated with a Gata4 reporter and negatively correlated with an Oct4 reporter.

      • Overexpression of Sry in murine embryonic stem cells results in reduced expression of the pluripotency markers Sox2 and Nanog.

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      New sources of retinoic acid synthesis revealed by live imaging of an Aldh1a2-GFP reporter fusion protein throughout zebrafish development (pages 1205–1216)

      Silke Pittlik and Gerrit Begemann

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23805

      Key findings:

      • Generation of a GFP reporter line in zebrafish by BAC recombineering that recapitulates aldh1a2 expression from its endogenous regulatory sequences.

      • The Aldh1a2-GFP fusion protein rescues embryonic lethality in aldh1a2/neckless mutants.

      • The reporter line identifies novel sources of retinoic acid (RA) synthesis in postembryonic developmental stages, such as in mantle cells of the lateral line organ and cells associated with the branchial arch skeleton.

      • aldh1a2 expression is reported in the vertebral column, supporting a previous hypothesis on the existence of a source of RA that promotes vertebral ossification.

      • Expression of aldh1a2 in the corpuscules of stannius, an organ derived from the pronephric kidney, suggests a role for RA signaling in controlling calcium homeostasis.

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      Identification of novel transcription-regulating genes expressed during murine molar development (pages 1217–1226)

      Kenta Uchibe, Hirohito Shimizu, Shigetoshi Yokoyama, Takuo Kuboki and Hiroshi Asahara

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23808

      Key findings:

      • 1520 transcription-regulating genes were screened to identify new genes in tooth development.

      • 28 genes were expressed in the developing molar.

      • The expression patterns in the tooth germ were examined through the embryonic tooth development.

  6. Shop Talk

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Annual Drosophila Research Conference, 2012 (pages 1227–1236)

      Gerald B. Call, Oorvashi Roy Puli, Anna M. James, Christopher R. Pope, Madhuri Kango-Singh and Amit Singh

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23806

  7. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Shop Talk
    8. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Voltage-gated calcium channel CACNB2 (β2.1) protein is required in the heart for control of cell proliferation and heart tube integrity (page 1237)

      Yelena Chernyavskaya, Alicia M. Ebert, Emily Milligan and Deborah M. Garrity

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23807

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