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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 8

August 2012

Volume 241, Issue 8

Pages 1239–1384

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Tol2 gene trap integrations in the zebrafish amyloid precursor protein genes appa and aplp2 reveal accumulation of secreted APP at the embryonic veins

      Hsin-Kai Liao, Ying Wang, Kristin E. Noack Watt, Qin Wen, Justin Breitbach, Chelsy K. Kemmet, Karl J. Clark, Stephen C. Ekker, Jeffrey J. Essner and Maura McGrail

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23829

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23820

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23830

  4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      The ENU-induced cetus mutation reveals an essential role of the DNA helicase DDX11 for mesoderm development during early mouse embryogenesis (pages 1249–1259)

      Christina D. Cota and María J. García-García

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23810

      Key findings:

      • cetus is an ENU-induced null allele of Ddx11 that disrupts helicase motif V.

      • Embryonic lethality in Ddx11cetus and Ddx11KO mutants is due to widespread apoptosis.

      • Ddx11cetus and Ddx11KO mutants with late lethality have severe morphological defects in somitic mesoderm, neural tube and heart.

      • Some Ddx11cetus and Ddx11KO mutants have early developmental arrest at embryonic day 7.5.

      • Differential requirements of Ddx11 during embryogenesis are not due to differential gene expression, but rather could be attributed to a different sensitivity of embryonic cells to DNA damage.

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      Regulation of early xenopus embryogenesis by smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (pages 1260–1273)

      Shaonli Das and Chenbei Chang

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23811

      Key findings:

      • Smurf2 regulates mesodermal induction and patterning, suggesting that it may control both nodal and BMP signals in the mesoderm in vivo.

      • Smurf2 modulates neural development in collaboration with Smurf1, a result consistent with their roles in inhibition of BMP signals.

      • Smurf2 can both up- and down-regulate neural crest markers, implying that it dynamically modulates its substrates temporally and/or spatially at the neural plate border.

      • Smurf1 and Smurf2 have overlapping and distinct functions during early Xenopus embryogenesis.

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      Slits affect the timely migration of neural crest cells via robo receptor (pages 1274–1288)

      Dion Giovannone, Michelle Reyes, Rachel Reyes, Lisa Correa, Darwin Martinez, Hannah Ra, Gustavo Gomez, Joshua Kaiser, Le Ma, Mary-Pat Stein and Maria Elena de Bellard

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23817

      Key findings:

      • Pre-migratory neural crest expresses Slit molecules.

      • Slit molecules affect cell cytoskeleton via Robo receptor.

      • Neural crest cells cytoskeleton is re-arranged, cells become less migratory.

      • Neural crest cells will not delaminate.

      • Slit delays crest EMT.

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      Hes1 is required for the development of the superior cervical ganglion of sympathetic trunk and the carotid body (pages 1289–1300)

      Yoko Kameda, Takayoshi Saitoh, Noriko Nemoto, Tokio Katoh and Sachiko Iseki

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23819

      Key findings:

      • Hes1 gene plays a role in maintaining the undifferentiated cells during development.

      • Hes1 null mutant embryos displayed a severe hypoplasia of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of sympathetic trunk.

      • Hes1 null mutants failed to form the common carotid artery as a partially penetrated phenotype (13.3%), resulting in the absence of the carotid body.

      • When the carotid artery was retained, the carotid body of the null mutants was smaller in size than that of wild types.

      • Neural crest derivatives, including the SCG, carotid body, and common carotid artery, were affected by the lack of Hes1.

  6. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      A universal analysis tool for the detection of asymmetric signal distribution in microscopic images (pages 1301–1309)

      Maja Matis, Jeffrey D. Axelrod and Milos Galic

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23818

      Key findings:

      • We present a novel technique to identify asymmetric protein and organelle distribution on the single cell level across the entire tissue.

      • This method can analyze subcellular localization (i.e., mean distance and direction) from the structure of interest to any cellular reference within the tissue.

      • Systematic sampling shows that this approach yields significant results over a wide parameter space making it suitable to assess asymmetry in a variety of tissues and potentially to study dynamic, polarized processes on the single cell level.

      • This method, which is based on cross-correlation of fluorescent intensities, is freely accessible and can be directly used without the need for additional image-processing.

  7. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Techniques
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biallelic expression of Tbx1 protects the embryo from developmental defects caused by increased receptor tyrosine kinase signaling (pages 1310–1324)

      Subreena Simrick, Dorota Szumska, Jennifer R. Gardiner, Kieran Jones, Karun Sagar, Bernice Morrow, Shoumo Bhattacharya and M. Albert Basson

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23812

      Key findings:

      • Sprouty gene deletion results in multiple developmental phenotypes characteristic of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

      • Contrary to expectations, reducing the Tbx1 gene dosage significantly exacerbates these phenotypes.

      • Tbx1 haploinsufficiency in the context of Sprouty gene deletion is associated with increased receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, suggesting that TBX1 can prevent excessive RTK signaling levels during development.

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      ILF-3 is a regulator of the neural plate border marker Zic1 in chick embryos (pages 1325–1332)

      K. J. Fishwick, E. Kim and M. E. Bronner

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23809

      Key findings:

      • Ilf-3, a novel gene in the chick, is expressed at early developmental stages.

      • Downregulation of Ilf-3 causes a reduction in Zic-1 expression at the neural plate border.

      • No other neural plate border gene examined is affected by loss of Ilf-3.

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      Timing and kinetics of E- to N-cadherin switch during neurulation in the avian embryo (pages 1333–1349)

      Alwyn Dady, Cedrine Blavet and Jean-Loup Duband

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23813

      Key findings:

      • E- to N-cadherin switch during neurulation reflects the partition of the neurectoderm into its main populations, neural tube, neural crest, and ectoderm.

      • E- to N-cadherin switch during neurulation is not synchronized with movements of neurulation.

      • E-to N-cadherin switch during neurulation is orchestrated by a specific set of transcription regulators distinct from those involved in EMT.

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      Neural tube defects by NUAK1 and NUAK2 double mutation (pages 1350–1364)

      Tomomi Ohmura, Go Shioi, Mariko Hirano and Shinichi Aizawa

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23816

      Key findings:

      • NUAK1 and NUAK2 double mutants exhibited exencephaly, facial clefting, and spina bifida.

      • In the double mutant cranial neural plate, median hinge point is formed, but dorsolateral hinge points are not apparent.

      • NUAK1 and NUAK2 complementarily function in the apical constriction and apico-basal elongation of the cranial neural plate, which are associated with the dorsolateral hinge point formation.

      • In the double mutant neural plate, phosphorylated myosin light chain 2, F-actin, and cortactin were normally found at the 5-somite stage, but subsequently did not concentrate in apical surfaces, concordant with the inefficient constriction. Acetylated α-tubulin-positive microtubules also began to be formed normally at the 5-somite stage, but subsequently did not develop significantly, concordant with poor elongation.

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      Circadian clock genes Bmal1 and Clock during early chick development (pages 1365–1373)

      Lisa Gonçalves, Maurícia Vinhas, Rui Pereira, Tomás Pais De Azevedo, Fernanda Bajanca and Isabel Palmeirim

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23821

      Key findings:

      • Circadian clock genes Bmal1 and Clock are expressed since the chick egg is laid.

      • Bmal1 and Clock are expressed in the early chick embryo with a “salt and pepper” pattern.

      • Bmal1/Clock gene expression pattern suggests nonsynchronous transcriptional oscillations.

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      Dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia at the early stages of colonization in the recipient testes of W/Wν male mice (pages 1374–1384)

      Ryohei Nagai, Mai Shinomura, Kasane Kishi, Yoshimi Aiyama, Kyoko Harikae, Takeshi Sato, Masami Kanai-Azuma, Masamichi Kurohmaru, Naoki Tsunekawa and Yoshiakira Kanai

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23824

      Key findings:

      • Spermatogenic stem cell (SSC) transplantation assays were used to examine the proliferative patterns and kinetics of donor-derived GFRα1-positive spermatogonia during early colonization.

      • GFRα1-positive cells formed several Aal(aligned)-like spherical cell aggregates within a single spermatogenic patch.

      • The appearance of GFRα1-positive Aal-like aggregates was positively correlated with regional, high-level expression of GDNF, a ligand for GFRα1.

      • These data imply that regional changes in GDNF signal levels may regulate the dynamics of Aal-like GFRα1-positive cell aggregates within each patch, resulting in further selection of survival colonies at later stages.

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