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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 9

September 2012

Volume 241, Issue 9

Pages 1385–1505

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23832

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23843

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Rab11 regulates planar polarity and migratory behavior of multiciliated cells in Xenopus embryonic epidermis (pages 1385–1395)

      Kyeongmi Kim, Blue B. Lake, Tomomi Haremaki, Daniel C. Weinstein and Sergei Y. Sokol

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23826

      Key findings:

      • Rab11 is enriched and polarized in multiciliated skin cells and their precursors.

      • Interference with Rab11 function in ciliated cell precursors causes migration defects and formation of randomly oriented apical domains.

      • Rab11 is required for the initial polarization of ciliated cell precursors, which is necessary for their intercalation into the superficial ectodermal layer.

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      The origin of the stapes and relationship to the otic capsule and oval window (pages 1396–1404)

      Hannah Thompson, Atsushi Ohazama, Paul T. Sharpe and Abigail S. Tucker

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23831

      Key Findings:

      • The stapedial footplate is of neural crest and mesoderm origin.

      • The otic capsule contributes to the stapedial footplate.

      • The neural crest component of the stapedial footplate is needed for development of the mesodermal component and for proper formation of the oval window.

      • The position of the oval window appears independent of the stapes.

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      Effects of retinoic acid and Gbx1 on feather-bud formation and epidermal transdifferentiation in chick embryonic cultured dorsal skin (pages 1405–1412)

      Akiko Obinata and Yoshihiro Akimoto

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23834

      Key Findings:

      • Gbx1 is involved in feather-bud formation.

      • Retinoic acid inhibits feather-bud formation, induces transdifferentiation of epidermis to mucosal epithelium, and increases Gbx1 expression.

      • Transfection of the epidermis with Gbx1 cDNA induces elongation of the feather bud, but does not induce transdifferentiation.

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      Morphogenesis of outflow tract rotation during cardiac development: The pulmonary push concept (pages 1413–1422)

      Roderick W.C. Scherptong, Monique R.M. Jongbloed, Lambertus J. Wisse, Rebecca Vicente-Steijn, Margot M. Bartelings, Robert E. Poelmann, Martin J. Schalij and Adriana C. Gittenberger-De Groot

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23833

      Key findings:

      • The addition of Nkx2.5-positive myocardial precursors from the anterior heart field occurs during normal development in an asymmetrical fashion, predominantly below the left branch of the 6th pharyngeal arch artery.

      • The continued addition of right-sided myocardium during normal development results in movement without spiralization of the OFT in which the pulmonary trunk orifice is pushed in a rightward and anterior direction, a mechanism referred to as “pulmonary push.”

      • Deficient or disorganized positioning of the Nkx2.5-positive precursors, as was observed in VEGF120/120 mutants might explain cardiac malformations with side-by-side position of the great arteries, such as double outlet right ventricle.

  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Time-lapse microscopy of macrophages during embryonic vascular development (pages 1423–1431)

      Sarah Al-Roubaie, Jasmine H. Hughes, Michael B. Filla, Rusty Lansford, Stephanie Lehoux and Elizabeth A.V. Jones

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23835

      Key findings:

      • We present a technique to double-label endothelial cells and macrophages with PKH26-PCL and AcLDL for in vivo time-lapsing.

      • The majority of double-labeled cells displayed an endothelial-like morphology, incorporating in the vessel wall and expressing Tie1, suggesting a myeloid-origin to some cells in the vessel wall.

      • Double-labeled cells that had integrated in the wall were largely immobile during normal development, however, could be recruited when remodeling was induced in the vascular network.

  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Genome-scale study of transcription factor expression in the branching mouse lung (pages 1432–1453)

      John C. Herriges, Lan Yi, Elizabeth A. Hines, Julie F. Harvey, Guoliang Xu, Paul A. Gray, Qiufu Ma and Xin Sun

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23823

      Key findings:

      • A genome-scale in situ hybridization screen for transcription factor gene expression in the pseudoglandular stage embryonic mouse lung.

      • Sixty-two transcription factor genes were highlighted to be expressed in distinct sub-regions of the lung epithelium and/or mesenchyme.

      • A number of the identified genes are not previously implicated in lung development.

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      ETV2 expression marks blood and endothelium precursors, including hemogenic endothelium, at the onset of blood development (pages 1454–1464)

      Sarah Wareing, Alexia Eliades, Georges Lacaud and Valerie Kouskoff

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23825

      Key findings:

      • ETV2 expression is tightly associated with the onset of yolk sac hematopoiesis.

      • In vitro and in vivo, ETV2 is expressed not only in FLK1+ cells but also in the TIE2+cKIT+ hemogenic endothelium.

      • ETV2 is absolutely required for the formation of the hemogenic endothelium.

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      Distinct roles of MicroRNAs in epithelium and mesenchyme during tooth development (pages 1465–1472)

      Shelly Oommen, Yoko Otsuka-Tanaka, Najam Imam, Maiko Kawasaki, Katsushige Kawasaki, Farnoosh Jalani-Ghazani, Angela Anderegg, Rajeshwar Awatramani, Robert Hindges, Paul T. Sharpe and Atsushi Ohazama

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23828

      Key findings:

      • Extra incisor tooth formation was found in ShhCre/Dicerfl/fl mice.

      • Wnt1Cre/Dicerfl/fl mice showed an arrest or absence of teeth development, which varied in frequency between incisors and molars.

      • Microarray an in situ hybridization analysis identified several miRNAs that showed differential expression between incisors and molars.

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      Cellular phenotypes and spatio-temporal patterns of lymphatic vessel development in embryonic mouse hearts (pages 1473–1486)

      A. Flaht, E. Jankowska-Steifer, D.M. Radomska, M. Madej, G. Gula, M. Kujawa and A. Ratajska

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23827

      Key findings:

      • The majority of scattered Lyve-1+ cells invading the embryonic heart possess the CD68 or the CD45 marker but not the CD31. A few scattered Lyve-1+ cells exhibit the CD11b or F4/80 antigen but not the CD31.

      • Lyve-1+/CD45+, Lyve-1+/CD68, Lyve-1+/CD11b+, and Lyve-1+/F4/80+ cells can be found in the lymphatic vessel wall (Lyve-1+/Prox-1+) once they have gained the Flk-1 antigen.

      • Apart from entering the embryonic heart via the arterial pole, the lymphatics invade also the venous pole, i.e., atrioventricular sulcus of the dorsal aspect of the heart and the dorsal aspect of the atrial surface.

      • The cellular phenotypes and spatio-temporal pattern of lymphatic primordia differ at the venous pole in comparison with the arterial pole.

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      Microarray-based identification of Pitx3 targets during Xenopus embryogenesis (pages 1487–1505)

      Lara Hooker, Cristine Smoczer, Farhad KhosrowShahian, Marian Wolanski and Michael J. Crawford

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23836

      Key findings:

      • A microarray assay and secondary confirmation of Pitx3 morphants indicates that Pax6, β Crystallin-b1 (Crybb1), Hes7.1, and Hes4 are good candidates for direct targets.

      • Four other genes show equivocal promise worthy of consideration: Vent2, and Ripply2 (aka Ledgerline or Stripy), eFGF and RXRα.

      • Novel genes described (but that are likely indirectly affected) are described: Rbp4l, Galectin IX, Baz2b, and Rdh16.

      • In addition to previously described interactions in lens and brain, Pitx3 also intersects the segmentation pathway and retinoid regulation.

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