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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 242, Issue 1

Pages C1–C1, 1–96

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
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      Slit/Robo-mediated chemorepulsion of vagal sensory axons in the fetal gut (page C1)

      David Goldberg, Rajka Borojevic, Monique Anderson, Jason J. Chen, Michael D. Gershon and Elyanne M. Ratcliffe

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23914

  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
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      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23915

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
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  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
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      In vitro tendon tissue development from human fibroblasts demonstrates collagen fibril diameter growth associated with a rise in mechanical strength (pages 2–8)

      Andreas Herchenhan, Monika L. Bayer, René B. Svensson, S. Peter Magnusson and Michael Kjær

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23896

      Key Findings:

      • Tendon constructs from human adult tendon cells develop a similar ultrastructure to similarly aged human embryonic tendon.

      • The collagen fibrils of adult human tendon cell derived constructs increase in diameter and packing density over 5 weeks.

      • The construct increases its mechanical strength and stiffness significantly over 5 weeks.

      • The tendon cells elongate similar to their natural configuration, however with considerably higher volume.

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      Slit/Robo-mediated chemorepulsion of vagal sensory axons in the fetal gut (pages 9–15)

      David Goldberg, Rajka Borojevic, Monique Anderson, Jason J. Chen, Michael D. Gershon and Elyanne M. Ratcliffe

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23898

      Key Findings:

      • Transcripts encoding Robo1 and Robo2 are expressed in developing and adult nodose ganglia.

      • Transcripts encoding Slit1, Slit2 and Slit3 are expressed in developing and adult gut.

      • Slit2 protein is located in the outer gut mesenchyme.

      • Neurites extending from explanted nodose ganglia are repelled by Slit2 in vitro.

      • Slit/Robo chemorepulsion may contribute to the establishment of the vagal sensory innervation of the fetal gut.

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      Halogenated nucleotide labeling of nascent RNAs reveals dynamic transcription in growing pig oocytes (pages 16–22)

      Reza K. Oqani, Min Gu Lee, Yun Fei Diao, Rong Xun Han and Dong Il Jin

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23901

      Key findings:

      • Growing pig oocytes undergo a dynamic chromatin compaction concomitant with increase in their size.

      • Pig oocytes are transcriptionally active in earlier stages of growth.

      • 5-fluorouridine incorporates into nascent RNAs and hence is a suitable compound for study of transcription-related events in pig oocytes.

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      Equarin is involved in cell adhesion by means of heparan sulfate proteoglycan during lens development (pages 23–29)

      Xiaohong Song, Yuya Sato, Kiyotoshi Sekiguchi, Hideaki Tanaka and Kunimasa Ohta

      Article first published online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23902

      Key findings:

      • Equarin promotes lens differentiating fiber cell adhesion through heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

      • Equarin binds syndecan-3.

      • Overexpression of Equarin alters actin organization during chick lens differentiation.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Equarin Is Involved in Cell Adhesion by Means of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan During Lens Development

      Vol. 242, Issue 3, 301, Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013

  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
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      Germline transgenesis of the chordate Ciona intestinalis with hyperactive variants of sleeping beauty transposable element (pages 30–43)

      Akiko Hozumi, Kaoru Mita, Csaba Miskey, Lajos Mates, Zsuzsanna Izsvak, Zoltan Ivics, Honoo Satake and Yasunori Sasakura

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23891

      Key findings:

      • In C. intestinalis, Minos is the only transposon that has been used as a tool for germline transformation.

      • We found that another transposon, sleeping beauty (SB), retains sufficient activity for the germline transformation of C. intestinalis.

      • SB-based germline transformation will result in breakthroughs in genetic approaches that use C. intestinalis together with Minos.

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      In vitro oocyte culture-based manipulation of zebrafish maternal genes (pages 44–52)

      Sreelaja Nair, Robin E. Lindeman and Francisco Pelegri

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23894

      Key findings:

      • In vitro maturation method coupled to in vitro fertilization for the functional manipulation of maternal genes in zebrafish

      • Injection of wild-type mRNAs into oocytes rescues maternal-effect mutations

      • Functional knock down/reverse genetics can be achieved by expression of dominant-negative products or injection of translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides

      • Expression of mRNAs coding for fluorescent fusion products allows visualizing the subcellular localization of maternal factors immediately after fertilization

  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
    1. You have free access to this content
      Spatio-temporal expression of HOX genes in human hindgut development (pages 53–66)

      Romana Illig, Helga Fritsch and Christoph Schwarzer

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23893

      Key findings:

      • Distinct spatio-temporal expression of HOX genes in human ontogeny.

      • Same HOX genes expressed in adult human rectum.

      • Marked differences between human development and animal models.

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      Redundant roles of PRDM family members in zebrafish craniofacial development (pages 67–79)

      Hai-Lei Ding, David E. Clouthier and Kristin B. Artinger

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23895

      Key findings:

      • prdm3, 5, 16 are expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal arches.

      • Knockdown of prdm3 and prdm16 results in neurocranium and viscerocranium defects and, in combination, is additive in the neurocranium.

      • prdm1a with prdm3 or prdm16 Morpholinos together leads to more severe phenotypes.

      • prdm5 mutants have defects in the neurocranium and prdm1a and prdm5 double mutants show more severe phenotypes.

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      Tissue-specific responses to aberrant FGF signaling in complex head phenotypes (pages 80–94)

      Neus Martínez-Abadías, Susan M. Motch, Talia L. Pankratz, Yingli Wang, Kristina Aldridge, Ethylin Wang Jabs and Joan T. Richtsmeier

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23903

      Key findings:

      • The most common Fgfr2 Crouzon syndrome mutation affects development of cranial tissues of varying embryological origin, as revealed by precise morphometric analysis of multi-modal images of heads of Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mouse model.

      • Expanded catalogue of clinical craniofacial phenotypes in Crouzon syndrome caused by aberrant FGF/FGFR signaling includes skull, brain, nasopharynx, and eye dysmorphologies.

      • Effects of the Fgfr2c C342Y mutation on various head tissues points to primary effects of this mutation on cell–cell signaling required in the development of each of these tissues and their integration.

      • Findings contribute to the growing evidence that FGF/FGFR signaling is part of a multifaceted set of interactions among genes and regulatory networks that drive communication among cells and tissues in the development of the head that has been highly conserved in vertebrate evolution.

      • Multimodal imaging and 3D morphometric methods used to evaluate differences in tissue and organ development in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mice can be applied to other models of human disease.

  7. Book Look

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Book Look
    1. You have free access to this content
      Book look (pages 95–96)

      Gerardo Antonio Cordero

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23890

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