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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 242, Issue 12

Pages C1–C1, 1347–1477

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24088

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      A new look at cytoskeletal NOS-1 and β-dystroglycan changes in developing muscle and brain in control and mdx dystrophic mice (pages 1369–1381)

      Alyssa Janke, Ritika Upadhaya, Wanda M. Snow and Judy E. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24031

      Key Findings

      • Age-dependent differences of immune-reactive NOS-1 and beta-dystroglycan in muscle are synchronized with stabilization of fiber membranes in development and similar to those in regenerative remodeling of muscle.
      • Age-dependent maturation of immune-reactive NOS-1 and beta-dystroglycan (localization and amount) and the NOS-1/bDG ratio in the brain, vary between forebrain and cerebellum brain.
      • The combined impact of dystrophin-deficiency and changes in NOS-1 and beta-dystroglycan localization and amount in diaphragm versus quadriceps muscles suggest differential loading (higher and earlier for diaphragm) contributes to the muscle-specific variability in onset and severity of the dystrophic phenotype.
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      Role of Sp5 as an essential early regulator of neural crest specification in xenopus (pages 1382–1394)

      Dong-Seok Park, Jeong-Han Seo, Mina Hong, Wonseon Bang, Jin-Kwan Han and Sun-Cheol Choi

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24034

      Key findings

      • Sp5 is expressed in the prospective neural crest regions from the gastrula through the tadpole stages in Xenopus embryos.
      • Sp5 is induced by Wnt and FGF signaling pathways and mediates their activities in neural crest induction.
      • Sp5 acts via Msx1 and Pax3 to regulate neural crest specification.
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      rbm47, a novel RNA binding protein, regulates zebrafish head development (pages 1395–1404)

      Rui Guan, Suzan El-Rass, David Spillane, Simon Lam, Yuodong Wang, Jing Wu, Zhuchu Chen, Anan Wang, Zhengping Jia, Armand Keating, Jim Hu and Xiao-Yan Wen

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24039

      Key findings

      • Human RBM47 is localized to the nucleus and is capable of interacting with RNA.
      • Morpholino-based rbm47 knockdown in zebrafish results in loss of or reduced head development.
      • Rbm47 functions through a pathway involving Wnt8a signaling.
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      SAS1B protein [ovastacin] shows temporal and spatial restriction to oocytes in several eutherian orders and initiates translation at the primary to secondary follicle transition (pages 1405–1426)

      Eusebio S. Pires, Callie Hlavin, Ellen Macnamara, Khadijat Ishola-Gbenla, Christa Doerwaldt, Catherine Chamberlain, Kenneth Klotz, Austin K. Herr, Aalok Khole, Olga Chertihin, Eliza Curnow, Sandford H. Feldman, Arabinda Mandal, Jagathpala Shetty, Charles Flickinger and John C. Herr

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24040

      Key findings

      • SAS1B protein is highly conserved in primary sequence and the ASTL gene is tightly regulated across eutherians, showing an identical immunohistochemical profile of ovarian expression and oocyte restriction among adult tissues, and a similar ∼44 to 55 kDa range of apparent protein masses.
      • SAS1B is first translated in ooplasm of follicles undergoing the primary-secondary follicle transition; quiescent germ cells in primordial follicles and early growing oocytes in primary follicles show no evidence of SAS1B protein translation in any species studied.
      • SAS1B is concentrated in the microvillar domain on the egg plasma membrane in species in which this feature is well developed. In species such as macaque, SAS1B shows a uniform distribution on the plasma membrane of GV oocytes.
      • A population of SAS1B is concentrated in cortical granules within mature oocytes indicating that the protein reaches the cell surface and redistributes on the oolemma and in the perivitelline space through exocytosis.
      • Due to SAS1B's oocyte specificity, restriction to growing oocytes, absence in the ovarian reserve, oolemmal localization, and wide distribution across eutherian species this metalloprotease is proposed as a candidate target for developing reversible nonhormonal female contraceptive agents in a range of mammalian species and may serve as a useful biomarker for growing oocytes that have entered the primary-secondary follicle transition and beyond.
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      Phylogeny and expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) genes in developing zebrafish (pages 1427–1441)

      Valentin Von Niederhäusern, Edda Kastenhuber, Andreas Stäuble, Matthias Gesemann and Stephan C.F. Neuhauss

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24041

      Key findings

      • The zebrafish Danio rerio genome hosts 12 canonical trp genes.
      • All orthologs but trpc1 and trpc3 are duplicated in the zebrafish genome.
      • Zebrafish trpc paralogs show a mostly nonoverlapping expression pattern.
      • The zebrafish trpc genes are expressed predominantly in the nervous system.
      • Distinct and dynamic expression patterns in various sensory and motor systems can be detected during development.
  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Editorial
    5. Special Issue Review–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    6. Research Articles
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      The germinal matrices in the developing dentate gyrus are composed of neuronal progenitors at distinct differentiation stages (pages 1442–1453)

      Taku Sugiyama, Noriko Osumi and Yu Katsuyama

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24035

      Key Findings

      • Majority of the Pax6-expressing cells is proliferative, while some are immature neurons in the developing dentate gyrus.
      • During early postnatal period, Pax6/Sox2-expressing cells are distributed throughout the area of developing dentate gyrus, and probably some of these incorporated in the subgranular zone to become the adult stem cells.
      • Transcriptional regulation of glutamatergic neuron differentiation was conserved in development of the dentate gyrus.
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      Testin interacts with vangl2 genetically to regulate inner ear sensory cell orientation and the normal development of the female reproductive tract in mice (pages 1454–1465)

      Dong-Dong Ren, Michael Kelly, Sun Myoung Kim, Cynthia Mary Grimsley-Myers, Fang-Lu Chi and Ping Chen

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24042

      Key findings

      • Identified Testin as a Vangl2-interacting protein in a two-hybrid screen.
      • Enrichment of Testin in PCP protein-containing compartments in culture cells.
      • Genetic inactivation of Testin in mice leads to misorientation of hair cells in the vestibule.
      • Testin interacting with Vangl2 genetically to coordinate hair cell orientation in the cochlea.
      • Testin is required for precise patterning of the organ of Corti.
      • Testin interacting with Vangl2 genetically during female reproductive tract development in mice.
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      Requirement for commissureless2 function during dipteran insect nerve cord development (pages 1466–1477)

      Joseph Sarro, Emily Andrews, Longhua Sun, Susanta K. Behura, John C. Tan, Erliang Zeng, David W. Severson and Molly Duman-Scheel

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24059

      Key findings

      • The vector mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus possess commissureless2 (comm2) genes (one and three, respectively) that are expressed by commissural axons during embryonic nerve cord development.
      • Knockdown of A. aegypti commissureless2 (Aae comm2), the single comm family ortholog in A. aegypti, results in a commissureless phenotype that phenocopies the frazzled (fra) loss of function phenotype in this species.
      • Mutation of D. melanogaster comm2, an ortholog of Aae comm2, also results in a commissureless phenotype which bears resemblance to the fra loss of function mutant.
      • Loss of Frazzled signaling in A. aegypti or D. melanogaster results in decreased comm2 expression, suggesting that Comm2 functions to mediate the conserved ability of Fra to down-regulate repulsion in precrossing commissural axons of both species.

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