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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 2

February 2013

Volume 242, Issue 2

Pages 1–200

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      In vitro oocyte culture-based manipulation of zebrafish maternal genes (page 1)

      Sreelaja Nair, Robin E. Lindeman and Francisco Pelegri

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23930

      Key findings:

      • In vitro maturation method coupled to in vitro fertilization for the functional manipulation of maternal genes in zebrafish
      • Injection of wild-type mRNAs into oocytes rescues maternal-effect mutations
      • Functional knock down/reverse genetics can be achieved by expression of dominant-negative products or injection of translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides
      • Expression of mRNAs coding for fluorescent fusion products allows visualizing the subcellular localization of maternal factors immediately after fertilization
  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      DD ArtPix (page 5)

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23931

  3. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Use of Zebrafish Embryos for Small Molecule Screening Related to Cancer (pages 97–107)

      Javier Terriente and Cristina Pujades

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23912

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Regulation of Primitive Hematopoiesis by Class I Histone Deacetylases (pages 108–121)

      Rishita R. Shah, Anne Koniski, Mansi Shinde, Shelby A. Blythe, Daniel M. Fass, Stephen J. Haggarty, James Palis and Peter S. Klein

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23906

      Key Findings:

      • Class I Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) activity contributes to primitive erythropoiesis in Xenopus and mouse.
      • Exposure to valproic acid or other class I HDAC inhibitors specifically during gastrulation blocks primitive erythropoiesis.
      • HDAC activity contributes to an early step in primitive erythropoiesis.
      • Class I HDACs function downstream of BMP and Gata1.
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      Segmental Assembly of Fibronectin Matrix Requires rap1b and integrin α5 (pages 122–131)

      Simone Lackner, Jamie Schwendinger-Schreck, Dörthe Jülich and Scott A. Holley

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23909

      Key Findings:

      • Knockdown of the small GTPase rap1b affects axis extension but not somite border morphogenesis.
      • Knockdown of rap1b in integrin α5/ mutants disrupts somite border morphogenesis along the entire anterior-posterior axis in zebrafish.
      • Loss of somite borders is due to failure of Fibronectin matrix assembly and somite border morphogenesis, not improper segmental patterning.
      • No genetic interaction is observed upon concomitant knockdown of rap1b and ephrinB2a.
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      Correct Timing of Proliferation and Differentiation is Necessary for Normal Inner Ear Development and Auditory Hair Cell Viability (pages 132–147)

      Benjamin J. Kopecky, Israt Jahan and Bernd Fritzsch

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23910

      Key Findings:

      • N-Myc can compensate for the loss of L-Myc during inner ear development but cannot be compensated for by L-Myc.
      • The combined loss of N-Myc and L-Myc during early inner ear development results in a more dramatic phenotype than previously described with the loss of N-Myc alone.
      • In the absence of both N-Myc and L-Myc, the timing between proliferation and differentiation in the inner ear is disrupted as shown by delayed expression and decreased mRNA levels of Neurod1, Atoh1, Pou4f3, and Barhl1, leading to cochlear hair cell death.
  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      A Technique to Increase Accessibility to Late-Stage Chick Embryos for In Ovo Manipulations (pages 148–154)

      James Spurlin III and Peter Lwigale

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23907

      Key findings:

      • A multistep technique to dissect extraembryonic membranes away from the developing chick embryo.
      • This technique permits access to late-stage chick embryos (between E5 and E8) in ovo, which is otherwise difficult, as the extraembryonic membranes obscure chick embryos shortly after E4.
      • Exposed late-stage chick embryos are viable and can be manipulated using standard developmental biology techniques to study organogenesis.
  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews: A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Meiotic gene expression initiates during larval development in the sea urchin (pages 155–163)

      Mamiko Yajima, Elena Suglia, Eric A. Gustafson and Gary M. Wessel

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23904

      Key Findings:

      • A series of meiotic gene products is expressed prior to metamorphosis in the sea urchin.
      • Meiotic gene products, both mRNA and protein, are broadly expressed in the entire adult rudiment of the sea urchin.
      • Germ cell development may be more plastic and/or the functions of these gene products more broadly required than previously thought.
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      Early development of the thymus in Xenopus laevis (pages 164–178)

      Young-Hoon Lee, Allison Williams, Chang-Soo Hong, Youngjae You, Makoto Senoo and Jean-Pierre Saint-Jeannet

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23905

      Key Findings:

      • The thymus primordia arise from the second pharyngeal pouch.
      • Thymus formation is independent of hoxa3 expression in the pouch endoderm.
      • foxn1 expression correlates with the initiation of thymic epithelial differentiation.
      • Neural crest cells are not required for thymus specification or T-cell differentiation.
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      Secreted Factor R-Spondin 2 is Involved in Refinement of Patterning of the Mammalian Cochlea (pages 179–188)

      J. F. Mulvaney, A. Yatteau, W. W. Sun, B. Jacques, K. Takubo, T. Suda, W. Yamada and A. Dabdoub

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23908

      Key findings:

      • Rspo2 is dynamically expressed in the cochlea over a short time period.
      • Loss of Rspo2 results in supernumerary hair cells in the organ of Corti.
      • Rspo2 is necessary for normal innervation of outer hair cells.
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      Identification and Expression Analysis of the Zebrafish Homologs of the ceramide synthase Gene Family (pages 189–200)

      Mirco Brondolin, Susanne Berger, Michael Reinke, Hideomi Tanaka, Toshio Ohshima, Bernhard Fuβ and Michael Hoch

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23913

      Key findings:

      • Zebrafish genome hosts nine cers genes which are evolutionarily conserved with respect to the mammalian cers gene family.
      • Cers2, cers3, and cers4 are duplicated in the zebrafish genome, whereas cers1, cers5, and cers6 are present as single copy genes suggesting a sub-functionalization process during evolution.
      • Spatial and temporal expression analysis of zebrafish cers genes during embryogenesis reveals elevated transcript levels in the developing central nervous system.
      • Tissue-specific expression of the various cers homolog genes may indicate a requirement for a broad repertoire of sphingolipids during zebrafish embryogenesis.
      • There is an overlap between cers expression and expression of serine palmitoyl transferase, another key enzyme of de novo ceramide synthesis.

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