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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 3

March 2013

Volume 242, Issue 3

Pages C1–C1, 201–301

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tissue-specific responses to aberrant FGF signaling in complex head phenotypes (page C1)

      Neus Martínez-Abadías, Susan M. Motch, Talia L. Pankratz, Yingli Wang, Kristina Aldridge, Ethylin Wang Jabs and Joan T. Richtsmeier

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23940

  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23941

  3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Regeneration of Functional Pronephric Proximal Tubules After Partial Nephrectomy in Xenopus laevis (pages 219–229)

      Shoshoni T. Caine and Kelly A. Mclaughlin

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23916

      Key Findings:

      • Novel finding that Xenopus laevis pronephric kidneys are capable of regenerating functional proximal tubules within 3 weeks of nephrectomy.
      • Apoptosis occurs within hours of nephrectomy. This event is not a general response to injury, but rather coincides with tubule excision.
      • Xmmp-9 is expressed in a biphasic pattern during the first week after removal of the proximal pronephric tubules. The timing of the first phase of expression is consistent with facilitating the wound healing process, whereas the second phase may be involved in the initial steps of tubule regeneration.
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      Expression of Neurogenin 1 in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Directs the Differentiation of Neuronal Precursors and Identifies Unique Patterns of Down-stream Gene Expression (pages 230–253)

      J. Matthew Velkey and K. Sue O'Shea

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23920

      Key Findings:

      • Inducible expression of Neurogenin1 in ESC provides a novel model of neurogenesis.
      • Pulsed expression of Neurogenin1 produces PNS and CNS neuronal sub-types.
      • Neurog1 promotes differentiation of neuronal precursors that exclusively form neurons.
      • This is the first description of the gene expression cascade downstream of Neurog1.
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      PDGF Receptor Alpha+ Mesoderm Contributes to Endothelial and Hematopoietic Cells in Mice (pages 254–268)

      Guo Ding, Yosuke Tanaka, Misato Hayashi, Shin-Ichi Nishikawa and Hiroshi Kataoka

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23923

      Key Findings:

      • PDGF receptor alpha–positive mesoderm contributes to endothelial and hematopoietic cells in physiological mouse embryogenesis.
      • PDGF receptor alpha–positive mesoderm in early embryo is distinct from yolk sac blood island mesoderm, representing a source of hematopoietic cells on the embryo proper side.
      • Genetic manipulation of Etv2 or Runx1 in PDGF receptor alpha–positive mesoderm demonstrates the functional significance of this mesoderm subset in vascular development and hematopoiesis.
  5. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Systematic Survey of Carbonic Anhydrase mRNA Expression During Mammalian Inner Ear Development (pages 269–280)

      Ling Wu, Borum Sagong, Jae Young Choi, Un-Kyung Kim and Jinwoong Bok

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23917

      Key findings:

      • A systematic survey for transcripts of all 16 mammalian carbonic anhydrase isozymes in various organs showed that each organ expresses unique combinations of carbonic anhydrase isozymes.
      • During inner ear development, transcripts of four cytosolic isozymes (Car1, Car2, Car3, and Car13), two membrane-bound isozymes (Car12 and Car14), and two CA-related proteins (Car8 and Car11) were expressed at higher levels than other isozymes.
      • Each isozyme showed a unique temporal and spatial expression pattern during inner ear development.
      • Expression patterns for some isozymes closely overlapped with genes previously associated with inner ear development or function, such as Pendrin, Pou3f4, or Bmp4.
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      During Embryogenesis, Esrp1 Expression Is Restricted to a Subset of Epithelial Cells and Is Associated With Splicing of a Number of Developmentally Important Genes (pages 281–290)

      Timothée Revil and Loydie A. Jerome-Majewska

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23918

      Key Findings:

      • The splicing factors Esrp1 and Esrp2 are differentially expressed in a time- and tissue-dependent manner during mouse embryogenesis.
      • The expression of Esrp1 correlates with the alternative splicing of Cask-1, Dock-7 and Osbpl3.
      • Using in situ RNA hybridization, we show that expression of Esrp1 is ubiquitous in E6.5 embryos, then becomes restricted to the chorion and definitive endoderm at E7.5.
      • Esrp1 expression is restricted in a subset of epithelial cell types in later staged mouse embryos.
    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Activation of the Canonical WNT Signaling Pathway Promotes Ovarian Surface Epithelial Proliferation Without Inducing β-Catenin/Tcf-Mediated Reporter Expression (pages 291–300)

      Macalister Usongo, Xinfang Li and Riaz Farookhi

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23919

      Key Findings:

      • β-catenin is localized to the cell membrane of OSE during postnatal development.
      • Canonical WNT signaling promotes OSE cell proliferation without inducing Tcf/Lef-mediated reporter expression.
      • Activation of the canonical WNT signaling pathway increases Tcf/Lef-mediated reporter gene activation in a cancer cell line–specific manner.
  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Equarin Is Involved in Cell Adhesion by Means of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan During Lens Development (page 301)

      Xiaohong Song, Yuya Sato, Kiyotoshi Sekiguchi, Hideaki Tanaka and Kunimasa Ohta

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23921

      This article corrects:

      Equarin is involved in cell adhesion by means of heparan sulfate proteoglycan during lens development

      Vol. 242, Issue 1, 23–29, Article first published online: 28 NOV 2012

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