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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 5

May 2013

Volume 242, Issue 5

Pages C1–C1, 401–592

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
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  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
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      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23975

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
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      The Corneal Epithelium and Lens Develop Independently From a Common Pool of Precursors (pages 401–413)

      Elodie Collomb, Ying Yang, Sarah Foriel, Sébastien Cadau, David J. Pearton and Danielle Dhouailly

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23925

      Key findings:

      • Inhibition of BMP signaling prevents lens but not corneal epithelium formation: the specification of the cornea does not require lens formation.
      • A common pool of eye ectodermal precursors arising early in development can give rise to either lens or corneal epithelium with their fate ultimately being determined by whether the environment is supportive of lens placode formation or not.
      • This pool can renew a surgically ablated lens placodal ectoderm as long as the environment is still conducive to the last step of lens induction.
      • The commitment of corneal epithelium correlates with both the loss of its capacity to down-regulate Pax6 as well as with the formation of its associated stroma.
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      Genetic Interaction Screens Identify a Role for Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila Border Cell Migration (pages 414–431)

      Erika R. Geisbrecht, Ketki Sawant, Ying Su, Ze (Cindy) Liu, Debra L. Silver, Ashley Burtscher, Xuejiao Wang, Alan Jian Zhu and Jocelyn A. McDonald

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23926

      Key findings:

      • Two independent genetic screens uncover a role for Hh signaling in cell migration.
      • Overexpression of Hh rescues Rac-dependent cell migration defects.
      • Disruption of Hh signaling affects E-cadherin and phosphorylated-tyrosine localization in the migrating border cells.
      • The Rac, Par-1 and Hh signaling pathways intersect in wing vein development.
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      Fibronectin mediates correct positioning of the interrenal organ in zebrafish (pages 432–443)

      Chih-Wei Chou, Chih-Hao Chiu and Yi-Wen Liu

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23932

      Key Findings:

      • Fibronectin accumulates around migrating steroidogenic cells, which are detected by a steroidogenic cell-specific zebrafish transgenic line, during the course of interrenal organ assembly.
      • Migration but not specification of steroidogenic interrenal cells is defective in the zebrafish fibronectin mutant.
      • Fibronectin distribution in the zebrafish interrenal microenvironment is at least in part contributed by the neighboring vasculature.
      • The assembly of zebrafish interrenal organ is aberrant in the absence of Fibronectin, due to migration defects of both steroidogenic and chromaffin cells.
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      Conditional expression of the dominant-negative TGF-β receptor type II elicits lingual epithelial hyperplasia in transgenic mice (pages 444–455)

      Feng Li and Mingliang Zhou

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23933

      Key Findings:

      • Mice lacking TGF-β signaling in K14+ cells during 35 days of TGF-β signaling disruption develop invasive carcinoma on the ventral surface of the tip of the tongue, while filiform papillae on the dorsal surface show different pathological changes from the tip to the posterior of the tongue.
      • Acetylation levels of histone H4 and histone H3 rapidly increase in the tip of the tongue after disruption of TGF-β signaling.
      • pMAPK activity is enhanced and Jagged2 inactivated in lingual epithelia after 3 days of TGF-β signaling disruption.
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      Pitx2-mediated cardiac outflow tract remodeling (pages 456–468)

      Hsiao-Yen Ma, Jun Xu, Diana Eng, Michael K. Gross and Chrissa Kioussi

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23934

      Key Findings:

      • Pitx2 controls cellularity of conotruncus.
      • Pitx2 regulates inductive signaling for endocardial cushion formation.
      • Pitx2 is a node of the network kernel for OT development.
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      Distinct roles for N-Cadherin linked c-Src and fyn kinases in lens development (pages 469–484)

      Michelle Leonard, Liping Zhang, Brigid M. Bleaken and A. Sue Menko

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23935

      Key Findings:

      • The Src family kinase member c-Src is highly localized to nascent junctions of undifferentiated lens epithelial cells.
      • c-Src functions as a negative regulator of N-cadherin junction maturation and lens epithelial cell differentiation initiation.
      • A src kinase-dependent signaling pathway distinct from c-Src is required for lens fiber cell elongation and lens morphogenesis.
      • The Src kinase Fyn, highly associated with the mature N-cadherin junctions of differentiating lens fiber cells, signals lens morphogenesis.
      • Integration of Src family kinase signaling with N-cadherin junctions regulates lens differentiation and morphogenesis.
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      Zebrafish tbx5 paralogs demonstrate independent essential requirements in cardiac and pectoral fin development (pages 485–502)

      Lindsay E. Parrie, Erin M. Renfrew, Aimee Vander Wal, Rachel Lockridge Mueller and Deborah M. Garrity

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23953

      Key Findings:

      • Zebrafish T-box transcription factor tbx5b is essential for cardiac development and pectoral fin morphogenesis.
      • Zebrafish tbx5a and tbx5b paralogs have distinct, nonredundant functions for heart and pectoral fin development.
      • tbx5a and tbx5b paralogs arose in the teleost-specific whole genome duplication event ∼270 million years ago.
  4. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
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      Fixation/Permeabilization: New Alternative Procedure for Immunofluorescence and mRNA In Situ Hybridization of Vertebrate and Invertebrate Embryos (pages 503–517)

      Juan Fernández and Ricardo Fuentes

      Version of Record online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23943

      Key Findings:

      • Our fixation/permeabilization procedure for immunofluorescence and mRNA in situ hybridization is a highly versatile procedure that works efficiently in diverse cell types of embryos of different taxa at different developmental stages.
      • The same fixation/permeabilization procedure allows independent or simultaneous immunofluorescence staining and mRNA in situ hybridization.
      • The fixation/permeabilization procedure combines good structural preservation of the cytoplasm with high reactivity of immunogenic sites and mRNA.
      • Fixation/permeabilization allows good immunofluorescence staining and mRNA in situ hybridization of both whole-mounted and cryosectioned embryos.
      • Short C-chain carboxylic acids appear to modulate the rate at which formaldehyde cross-links cell proteins.
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      3D quantitative analyses of angiogenic sprout growth dynamics (pages 518–526)

      Abbas Shirinifard, Catherine W. McCollum, Maria Bondesson Bolin, Jan-Åke Gustafsson, James A. Glazier and Sherry G. Clendenon

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23946

      Key Findings:

      • New technique for quantitative analyses of 3D angiogenic sprout growth dynamics.
      • Useful for analysis of perturbations due to genetic manipulations and exposure to drugs and environmental toxins.
      • Using this new technique we showed that angiogenic sprouts in arsenic treated zebrafish had lower directed migration speed and decreased directional persistence than controls.
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      3D imaging, registration, and analysis of the early mouse embryonic vasculature (pages 527–538)

      Gregory A. Anderson, Michael D. Wong, Jian Yang and R. Mark Henkelman

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23947

      Key Findings:

      • Conventional developmental biology techniques do not allow for a full appreciation of the 3D nature of cardiovascular development.
      • Mouse embryo populations imaged by optical projection tomography (OPT) and subsequently registered together in 3D allow for the comparison of vascular maps of individual mice.
      • Small developmental differences in both blood vessel and cardiac development are distinguishable in mouse embryos that differ by as little as a few hours of gestational time.
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      Heat-shock–mediated conditional regulation of hedgehog/gli signaling in zebrafish (pages 539–549)

      Meng-Chieh Shen, A. Tuba Ozacar, Marcey Osgood, Crina Boeras, Jochebed Pink, Jeanne Thomas, Jhumku D. Kohtz and Rolf Karlstrom

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23955

      Key Findings:

      • Four new heat-shock–inducible transgenic lines allow temporal manipulation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in zebrafish.
      • Heat shock of these lines effectively activates or represses Hh signaling through embryonic and early larval stages. Hh signaling is disrupted, but to a lesser degree, at larval and early adult stages.
      • Hh signaling can be cell-autonomously increased or decreased at the transcriptional level, or activated non–cell-autonomously at the level of the Sonic Hh (Shh) ligand.
      • Two new Hh/Gli reporter lines sensitively label Hh responding cells throughout the life cycle and allow visualization of graded Hh responses in the CNS.
  5. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
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      Tbx1 is required for second heart field proliferation in zebrafish (pages 550–559)

      Kathleen Nevis, Pablo Obregon, Conor Walsh, Burcu Guner-Ataman, C. Geoffrey Burns and Caroline E. Burns

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23928

      Key Findings:

      • Tbx1 is required for second heart field development in zebrafish.
      • Tbx1 transcripts do not overlap with cardiac progenitor cells or differentiated cardiomyocytes during early cardiogenesis in zebrafish.
      • First heart field progenitors differentiate normally in tbx1 mutants.
      • Second heart field progenitor specification is largely normal in tbx1 mutants.
      • Second heart field proliferation is severely decreased in tbx1 mutants.
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      Reflectin genes and development of iridophore patterns in Sepia officinalis embryos (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) (pages 560–571)

      Aude Andouche, Yann Bassaglia, Sébastien Baratte and Laure Bonnaud

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23938

      Key Findings:

      • All reflectin genes (six) are expressed during embryonic development in Sepia officinalis.
      • mRNA expression of these reflectins were detected in iridophores beginning late embryogenesis (at stage 25).
      • Reflectin proteins are rapidly produced and reflectin mRNA synthesis is attenuated before hatching.
      • Reflectin genes appear to be coexpressed in areas of future iridescence.
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      Characterization of pax1, pax9, and uncx sclerotomal genes during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis (pages 572–579)

      Romel Sebastián Sánchez and Sara S. Sánchez

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23945

      Key Findings:

      • The pax1, pax9, and uncx genes of the anuran Xenopus laevis were cloned.
      • The pax1, pax9, and uncx genes are expressed in the pharyngeal pouch and sclerotome in the tail bud stage of Xenopus embryos.
      • The pax1, pax9, and uncx genes are expressed in different subdomains of the sclerotome of Xenopus embryos.
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      Resolution of defective dorsal aortae patterning in Sema3E-deficient mice occurs via angiogenic remodeling (pages 580–590)

      Stryder M. Meadows, Lyndsay A. Ratliff, Manvendra K. Singh, Jonathan A. Epstein and Ondine Cleaver

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23949

      Key Findings:

      • Embryonic dorsal aortae patterning defects in Sema3E−/− mice resolve during subsequent development.
      • Resolution of Sema3E−/− dorsal aortae occurs via angiogenic remodeling.
      • Sema3E is not required for fusion of the paired aortae into a single midline aorta.
  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy elucidates details on mouse ear development (pages 591–592)

      Benjamin Kopecky, Shane Johnson, Heather Schmitz, Peter Santi and Bernd Fritzsch

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23939

      This article corrects:

      Scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy elucidates details on mouse ear development

      Vol. 241, Issue 3, 465–480, Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2012

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