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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 6

June 2013

Volume 242, Issue 6

Pages C1–C1, 593–799

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      RNA interference by feeding in vitro–synthesized double-stranded RNA to planarians: Methodology and dynamics (page C1)

      Labib Rouhana, Jennifer A. Weiss, David J. Forsthoefel, Hayoung Lee, Ryan S. King, Takeshi Inoue, Norito Shibata, Kiyokazu Agata and Phillip A. Newmark

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23982

  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23983

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Expression of Foxi3 is regulated by ectodysplasin in skin appendage placodes (pages 593–603)

      Vera Shirokova, Maria Jussila, Marjo K. Hytönen, Nina Perälä, Cord Drögemüller, Tosso Leeb, Hannes Lohi, Kirsi Sainio, Irma Thesleff and Marja L. Mikkola

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23952

      Key findings

      • Transcription factor Foxi3 is mutated in several hairless dog breeds.
      • Expression of Foxi3 is confined to epithelia of several ectodermal organs.
      • Foxi3 expression is regulated by ectodysplasin and activin A pathways.
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      Expression of ski can act as a negative feedback mechanism on retinoic acid signaling (pages 604–613)

      Meaghan A. Melling, Charlotte R.C. Friendship, Trevor G. Shepherd and Thomas A. Drysdale

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23954

      Key fingings

      • Addition of retinoic acid increases Ski transcript levels in Xenopus embryos and mammalian cells.
      • Addition of a retinoic acid antagonist results in reduced levels of Ski transcripts in Xenopus embryos and mammalian cells.
      • Addition of retinoic acid appears to directly activate Ski expression.
      • Over expression of Ski results in reduced transcript levels of the retinoic acid target gene, Cyp26a1.
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      Zebrafish churchill regulates developmental gene expression and cell migration (pages 614–621)

      Andrew Taibi, Kunal P. Mandavawala, Justine Noel, Ejike V. Okoye, Carolyn R. Milano, Benjamin L. Martin and Howard I. Sirotkin

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23958

      Key findings

      • Zygotic and Maternal Zygotic zebrafish churchill mutants are viable.
      • Churchill modulates TGF-β signaling, but not FGF signaling during development.
      • Cell transplant assays reveal that Churchill is required to limit cell migration.
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      Multiparametric image analysis of lung-branching morphogenesis (pages 622–637)

      Carsten Schnatwinkel and Lee Niswander

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23961

      Key Findings

      • Morphologically distinct stages during planar bifurcation and domain branching in lung explants.
      • Lung branching is driven by cell division–based tissue and cell displacement that is coordinated by local mechanical forces.
      • Cell division orientation contributes to tissue morphology. Parallel oriented cell division along the longitudinal epithelial axis favors tissue elongation, whereas perpendicular orientation favors tissue expansion.
      • Myosin light chain kinase is a molecular regulator of bud bifurcation, but not domain branch formation in lung explants.
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      Transcription factor Sox11 is essential for both embryonic and adult neurogenesis (pages 638–653)

      Yong Wang, Lu Lin, Helen Lai, Luis F. Parada and Lei Lei

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23962

      Key findings

      • A Sox11 floxed allele and a Sox11 null allele were generated using the Cre-loxP system.
      • Sox11 null embryos had smaller and disorganized brains, accompanied by reduced proliferation during neurogenesis.
      • Ablation of Sox11 specifically in adult NPCs caused a significant reduction of proliferation in the hippocampus.
      • Sox11 regulates the expression of Nmyc, Lis1, and TAK1, which are known to play important roles in proliferation, neuronal migration and differentiation.
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      Dominant negative mutations of caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 confer a novel developmental phenotype (pages 654–664)

      Matt Crook and Warwick N. Grant

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23963

      Key Findings

      • TGF-β truncation, cleavage, and ligand domain mutations affect ligand function.
      • We recreated these three classes of mutations in C. elegans daf-7, a TGF-β ligand that controls entry into diapause.
      • A series of truncations, a W264R substitution, and preventing pro-protein DAF-7 cleavage render DAF-7 non-functional.
      • A subset of our daf-7 mutations produce a dominant negative molting and excretory phenotype in a daf-7/+ background.
      • These daf-7 mutants act via both daf-7 and dbl-1 pathways downstream of their shared Type II receptor, DAF-4.
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      Resolving cell lineage contributions to the ventricular conduction system with a Cx40-GFP allele: A dual contribution of the first and second heart fields (pages 665–677)

      Lucile Miquerol, Anaïs Bellon, Natividad Moreno, Sabrina Beyer, Sigolène M. Meilhac, Margaret Buckingham, Diego Franco and Robert G. Kelly

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23964

      Key Findings

      • Clonal analysis reveals that the ventricular conduction system is comprised of cells derived from two progenitor cell lineages.
      • The dual ventricular conduction lineages contribute to either the right Purkinje fiber network or left bundle branch and likely correspond to contributions of first and second heart field progenitor cells.
      • Central components of the ventricular conduction system are descended from both lineages and segregate early from adjacent working myocytes.
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      Jagged1 is the major regulator of notch-dependent cell fate in proximal airways (pages 678–686)

      Shubing Zhang, Amanda J. Loch, Freddy Radtke, Sean E. Egan and Keli Xu

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23965

      Key Findings

      • Jagged1 regulates airway cell fate decision in the developing lung
      • Jagged1 prevents mucous metaplasia in the postnatal lung
      • Jagged1 influences alveologenesis
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      HOXA13 regulates Aldh1a2 expression in the autopod to facilitate interdigital programmed cell death (pages 687–698)

      Siming Shou, Hanqian L. Carlson, Wilma D. Perez and H. Scott Stadler

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23966

      Key Findings

      • Aldh1a2 expression is significantly reduced in Hoxa13 homozygous mutant limbs.
      • HOXA13 directly binds a conserved cis-regulatory element in the Aldh1a2 locus in the autopod.
      • Reduced Aldh1a2 expression in the Hoxa13 mutant limb causes decreased RA signaling in the interdigital tissues.
      • Maternal supplementation with sub-teratogenic dosages of RA partially restores interdigital programmed cell death in the Hoxa13 mutant limb.
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      Snai1 is important for avian epicardial cell transformation and motility (pages 699–708)

      Ge Tao, Lindsey J. Miller and Joy Lincoln

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23967

      Key Findings

      • Snai1 is highly expressed throughout avian epicardial development.
      • Snai1 is sufficient to promote proepicardial cell migration in vitro.
      • Snai1 overexpression enhances epicardial-to-mesenchymal transformation in avian explants in vitro.
      • Snai1 enhances epicardial cell invasion through MMPs in avian explants in vitro.
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      Validation of novel reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in Xenopus tropicalis during embryonic and post-embryonic development (pages 709–717)

      Sophie Dhorne-Pollet, Aurore Thélie and Nicolas Pollet

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23972

      Key Findings:

      • We investigated the expression stability of 10 Xenopus tropicalis genes (dicer1, drosha, eef1a1, elavl3, gsc, h4, odc1, rpl8, smn2, tbp) using RT-qPCR on a set of 15 developmental stages from the egg to the froglet, and on dissected embryos.
      • For early embryonic development up to the end of metamorphosis, we recommend using dicer1, drosha, eef1a1, and smn2.
      • For early embryonic development up to feeding stage, we recommend using drosha, eef1a1, and smn2.
      • For the whole post-embryonic development and for metamorphic stages including pro-metamorphosis and metamorphic climax, we recommend using drosha and smn2.
  4. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      RNA interference by feeding in vitro–synthesized double-stranded RNA to planarians: Methodology and dynamics (pages 718–730)

      Labib Rouhana, Jennifer A. Weiss, David J. Forsthoefel, Hayoung Lee, Ryan S. King, Takeshi Inoue, Norito Shibata, Kiyokazu Agata and Phillip A. Newmark

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23950

      Key Findings

      • In vitro-synthesized dsRNA is fed to planarians to induce robust RNAi.
      • Presentation of an improved protocol for RNAi in planarians amenable to high-throughput studies.
      • Analysis of dsRNA processing dynamics and spatiotemporal RNAi activity.
      • Systematic comparisons of effects of variations in amount, frequency and mode of dsRNA delivery on RNAi efficiency.
  5. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Research Articles
    5. Techniques
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Drosophila CIAPIN1 homologue is required for follicle cell proliferation and survival (pages 731–737)

      Orly Marzuk, Gabriella Peretz, Anna Bakhrat and Uri Abdu

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23951

      Key findings

      • The D-CIAPIN1 CX2C motif is important for protein function.
      • D-CIAPIN1 is an essential gene required for ovarian development.
      • D-CIAPIN1 is required for proliferation of follicle cells during egg chamber development.
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      Expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors during the formation of the periocular vasculature and development of the avian cornea (pages 738–751)

      Sam Kwiatkowski, Ravi P. Munjaal, Teresa Lee and Peter Y. Lwigale

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23956

      Key findings

      • Angioblasts migrate into the periocular region of the eye during development, but avoid the presumptive cornea.
      • Pro- and anti-angiogenic factors are expressed within the vicinity of the developing cornea, whereas angioblasts, periocular mesenchyme and forming ocular vasculature express their receptors.
      • Expression profile of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors and their receptors suggest their potential roles in ocular vasculogenesis and corneal avascularity during development.
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      Evolutionary conservation of the placodal transcriptional network during sexual and asexual development in chordates (pages 752–766)

      Fabio Gasparini, Valentina Degasperi, Sebastian M. Shimeld, Paolo Burighel and Lucia Manni

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23957

      Key findings

      • We here characterize B. schlosseri orthologues of Six1/2, Six3/6, Eya, and FoxI, and report their spatiotemporal expression patterns during both embryogenesis and blastogenesis in the colonial tunicate B. schlosseri.
      • Our results show that these genes are expressed both in larva and bud during branchial fissure formation, and in two domains along the anterior–posterior axis.
      • We hypothesize that the latter are placodal homologue territories that can be recognized during not only sexual but also asexual development of tunicates.
      • We discuss the idea that placode origin predates the origin of vertebrates and the molecular network involving these genes was co-opted in the evolution of asexual reproduction.
      • We consider possible alternative evolutionary scenarios depicting gene co-option as critical step in placode and pharynx evolution.
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      Diversity and conservation of CELF1 and CELF2 RNA and protein expression patterns during embryonic development (pages 767–777)

      Y. Blech-Hermoni, S.J. Stillwagon and A.N. Ladd

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23959

      Key Findings

      • Developmental regulation of CELF1 and CELF2 protein dynamics is independent of transcript levels in the embryonic heart.
      • CELF1 and CELF2 transcripts are largely co-expressed, but are found in mutually exclusive territories in several tissues.
      • Several tissue- and subcellular compartment-specific isoforms of CELF1 and CELF2 proteins suggest a means for functional diversity and specificity for these proteins.
      • CELF1 and CELF2 expression patterns are largely conserved between chicken and mouse embryos.
    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Expression of glycosaminoglycan epitopes during zebrafish skeletogenesis (pages 778–789)

      Anthony J. Hayes, Ruth E. Mitchell, Andrew Bashford, Scott Reynolds, Bruce Caterson and Chrissy L. Hammond

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23970

      Key Findings:

      • The developing zebrafish skeleton expresses many different glycosaminoglycan modifications.
      • Multiple different glycosaminoglycan epitopes are dynamically expressed in the craniofacial skeleton.
      • Expression of chondroitin sulfate moieties are dynamically expressed in the vertebral column and precede mineralisation.
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      The transcription factor sry-related HMG box-4 (SOX4) is required for normal renal development in vivo (pages 790–799)

      Jez Huang, Michel Arsenault, Martin Kann, Carlos Lopez-Mendez, Monique Saleh, Dorota Wadowska, Mary Taglienti, Jacqueline Ho, Yuan Miao, David Sims, Jonathan Spears, Alfonso Lopez, Glenda Wright and Sunny Hartwig

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23971

      Key Findings:

      • SoxC genes exhibit overlapping but distinct patterns of expression in the nephrogenic lineages during renal development.
      • Conditional ablation of Sox4 in the nephrogenic lineage results in reduced nephron number.
      • Postnatal Sox4nephron- mice develop severe early-onset kidney injury leading to renal failure in vivo.
      Corrected by:

      Erratum: The transcription factor sry-related HMG box-4 (SOX4) is required for normal renal development in vivo

      Vol. 244, Issue 4, 628, Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2015

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