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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 242 Issue 9

September 2013

Volume 242, Issue 9

Pages C1–C1, 1021–1120

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Region-specific epithelial cell dynamics during branching morphogenesis (page C1)

      Jeff C. Hsu, Hyun Koo, Jill S. Harunaga, Kazue Matsumoto, Andrew D. Doyle and Kenneth M. Yamada

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24028

  2. Art Pix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24029

  3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Heparan sulfate in skeletal development, growth, and pathology: The case of hereditary multiple exostoses (pages 1021–1032)

      Julianne Huegel, Federica Sgariglia, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Eiki Koyama, John P. Dormans and Maurizio Pacifici

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24010

      Key findings

      • Heparan sulfate proteoglycans and several growth factors they control are expressed and active in the growth plate and surrounding perichondrium.
      • Congenital mutations in HS-synthesizing and modifying enzymes and HSPG expression cause severe skeletal and craniofacial phenotypes.
      • Recent developments in understanding hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) suggest that aberrant growth factor signaling plays a major role in exostosis initiation and growth.
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Habenular commissure formation in zebrafish is regulated by the pineal gland–specific gene unc119c (pages 1033–1042)

      Reiko Toyama, Mi Ha Kim, Martha L. Rebbert, John Gonzales, Harold Burgess and Igor B. Dawid

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23994

      Key Findings

      • Unc119c is involved in habenular commissure formation in the zebrafish forebrain
      • Unc119c and Wnt4a have synergistic effects in habenular commissure formation
      • We suggest that Unc119c acts in habenular commissure formation by affecting Wnt4a expression in the zebrafish pineal gland
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      Initiation of primary myogenesis in amniote limb muscles (pages 1043–1055)

      Antonio S.J. Lee, John Harris, Michael Bate, Krishnaswamy Vijayraghavan, Lorryn Fisher, Shahragim Tajbakhsh and Marilyn Duxson

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23998

      Key findings

      • Primary myogenesis in vivo is a critical stage for patterning muscle, but is poorly understood.
      • In rat and mouse limb buds it occurs in muscle masses expressing Pax3 protein, but before Pax7 protein is detected.
      • The first primary myotubes are elongate, mononucleated myocytes, and they appear before cleavage of the muscle masses.
      • Multinucleation occurs approximately a day later, synchronous with appearance of Pax7 protein in the muscle masses.
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      Investigation of retinoic acid function during embryonic brain development using retinaldehyde-rescued Rdh10 knockout mice (pages 1056–1065)

      Christina Chatzi, Thomas J. Cunningham and Gregg Duester

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23999

      Key findings

      • Rdh10 knockout mouse embryos lack physiological RA activity early in the forebrain and later in the meninges.
      • RA is not required for control of key forebrain patterning genes although RA is required for hindbrain patterning.
      • RA generated in the meninges is not required for radial expansion of the forebrain cortex.
      • Rdh10−/− embryos conditionally rescued with early retinaldehyde treatment allow examination of late RA function.
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      Region-specific epithelial cell dynamics during branching morphogenesis (pages 1066–1077)

      Jeff C. Hsu, Hyun Koo, Jill S. Harunaga, Kazue Matsumoto, Andrew D. Doyle and Kenneth M. Yamada

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24000

      Key findings

      • Motility of individual salivary gland epithelial cells differs by region during branching morphogenesis.
      • Migration speed is highest in outer bud cells close to the basement membrane and low in inner bud and duct cells.
      • Integrin interactions are necessary for both motility and morphology of outer bud cells.
      • Myosin II, but not E-cadherin, is needed for outer bud cell migration.
      • These findings identify crucial roles for epithelial cell interactions with the basement membrane for both high motility and tissue organization.
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      Inhibition of tumor formation and redirected differentiation of glioblastoma cells in a xenotypic embryonic environment (pages 1078–1093)

      Mrinal Joel, Cecilie J. Sandberg, Jean-Luc Boulland, Einar O. Vik-Mo, Iver A. Langmoen and Joel C. Glover

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24001

      Key Findings

      • GSC-enriched GBM cells from different patients exhibit different gene expression profiles in vitro.
      • GSC-enriched GBM cells form tumors in mouse brain and chicken embryo CAM but not in the chicken embryo spinal neural tube.
      • Proliferation and survival of GSC-enriched GBM cells is reduced in the chicken embryo spinal neural tube.
      • GSC-enriched GBM cells show tumor-atypical gene expression changes in the chicken embryo spinal neural tube, including strong up-regulation of PTEN.
  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine overlapping gene expression in whole-mount mouse embryos (pages 1094–1100)

      Stanley J. Neufeld, Xiaolan Zhou, Peter D. Vize and John Cobb

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23993

      Key Findings

      • Whole-mount FISH can be used to visualize gene expression in diverse tissues.
      • Relative expression pattern of two genes can be seen in a single mouse embryo.
      • FISH can be paired with confocal microscopy to image internal regions of a specimen.
  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Art Pix
    4. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nuclear phosphatase PPM1G in cellular survival and neural development (pages 1101–1109)

      William H. Foster, Adam Langenbacher, Chen Gao, Jaunian Chen and Yibin Wang

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23990

      Key Findings

      • PPM1G is essential for mouse and zebrafish embryonic development
      • Loss of PPM1G leads to neuronal cell death and development defects in zebrafish and mice
      • PPM1G regulates cell proliferation in vitro
      • PPM1G regulates stress-induced cell death in vitro
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      Morphogenetic analysis of peri-implantation development (pages 1110–1120)

      Mary C. Wallingford, Jesse R. Angelo and Jesse Mager

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23991

      Key findings

      • Morphogenetic analysis of the peri-implantation embryo in vivo (within the uterus) throughout peri-implantation development.
      • Detailed graphic summary of in vivo peri-implantation development.
      • Identification of novel molecular events in the uterine epithelium associated with implantation.

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