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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 243 Issue 1

Special Issue: Hox/Tale Transcription Factors in Development and Disease

January 2014

Volume 243, Issue 1

Pages C1–C1, 1–200

Issue edited by: Deneen Wellik, Miguel Torres, Marian Ros

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Special Issue Perspective
    4. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Review Forum
    5. Special Issue Research Articles
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      Patterning of sexually dimorphic neurogenesis in the Caenorhabditis elegans ventral cord by Hox and TALE homeodomain transcription factors (page C1)

      Andrea K. Kalis, Djem U. Kissiov, Emily S. Kolenbrander, Zachary Palchick, Shraddha Raghavan, Breanna J. Tetreault, Erin Williams, Curtis M. Loer and Jennifer Ross Wolff

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24043

  2. Special Issue Perspective

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Special Issue Perspective
    4. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Review Forum
    5. Special Issue Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Review Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Special Issue Perspective
    4. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Review Forum
    5. Special Issue Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hox regulation of transcription: More complex(es) (pages 4–15)

      Franck Ladam and Charles G. Sagerström

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23997

      Key findings

      • Hox proteins function in multi-subunit complexes.
      • Hox complexes contain cofactors and general transcription regulatory factors.
      • Hox complexes of different composition have different functions.
      • Hox complexes may switch from one function to another by changes in composition.
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      Tracking context-specific transcription factors regulating hox activity (pages 16–23)

      Samir Merabet and Amélie Dard

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24002

      Key Findings

      • BiFC as a new tool for deciphering new interaction networks in vivo.
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      Controlling Hox gene expression and activity to build the vertebrate axial skeleton (pages 24–36)

      Ana Casaca, Ana Cristina Santos and Moisés Mallo

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24007

      Key Findings

      • Timing of Hox gene activation in the early embryo is essential for proper regulation of vertebral identity.
      • Epigenetic regulation of the Hox clusters is likely to contribute to the temporal control of Hox gene expression in the early embryo.
      • Hox proteins contain patterning information specifying different characteristics of the axial skeleton, which reside to a large extent outside the homeodomain.
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      Joining the fingers: A HOXD13 story (pages 37–48)

      Nathalie Brison, Philippe Debeer and Przemko Tylzanowski

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24037

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      Biochemistry of the tale transcription factors PREP, MEIS, and PBX in vertebrates (pages 59–75)

      E. Longobardi, D. Penkov, D. Mateos, G. De Florian, M. Torres and Francesco Blasi

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24016

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      Region-specific regulation of posterior axial elongation during vertebrate embryogenesis (pages 88–98)

      Roel Neijts, Salvatore Simmini, Fabrizio Giuliani, Carina van Rooijen and Jacqueline Deschamps

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24027

      Key findings

      • Morphogenesis of anterior to posterior body regions depends on different rules
      • Bipotent self-renewing axial progenitors ensure the growth of trunk tissues
      • These progenitors cannot be visualized by unique markers
      • The niche of these progenitors is key to their properties
      • The genetic network underlying axial growth comprises transcription factors such as T Brachyury, Sox2 and Hox-like proteins, and signaling pathways by Wnt, Fgf and RA.
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  4. Special Issue Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Special Issue Perspective
    4. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Review Forum
    5. Special Issue Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Homothorax plays autonomous and nonautonomous roles in proximodistal axis formation and migration of the Drosophila renal tubules (pages 132–144)

      Adi Zohar-Stoopel, Nitzan Gonen, Mohammed Mahroum, Doreen S. Ben-Zvi, Hila Toledano and Adi Salzberg

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24011

      Key findings

      • Homothorax is differentially expressed along the proximodistal axis of the Malpighian tubules and is required for defining distal versus proximal cell identities.
      • In the absence of Homothorax or Extradenticle the tubules fail to rearrange and migrate anteriorly.
      • Homothorax is required within the tubules for proper formation of the leading loop and in surrounding mesodermal tissues for directing anterior migration.
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      Hoxa9 collaborates with E2A-PBX1 in mouse B cell leukemia in association with Flt3 activation and decrease of B cell gene expression (pages 145–158)

      Mona Hassawi, Elena A. Shestakova, Marilaine Fournier, Charles-Étienne Lebert-Ghali, Gratianne Vaisson, Héloïse Frison, Daniel Sinnett, Ramon Vidal, Alexander Thompson and Janet J. Bijl

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24056

      Key findings

      • Critical B cell genes are down-regulated in leukemias induced by E2A-PBX1 and Hoxa9.
      • Hoxa9 mediated block in B cell differentiation in E2A-PBX1 leukemias involves Flt3.
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      Patterning of sexually dimorphic neurogenesis in the Caenorhabditis elegans ventral cord by Hox and TALE homeodomain transcription factors (pages 159–171)

      Andrea K. Kalis, Djem U. Kissiov, Emily S. Kolenbrander, Zachary Palchick, Shraddha Raghavan, Breanna J. Tetreault, Erin Williams, Curtis M. Loer and Jennifer Ross Wolff

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24064

      Key Findings

      • C. elegans male and hermaphrodite ventral nerve cords are sexually distinct with sex determination occurring during the first larval stage.
      • Hox genes lin-39 and mab-5 influence multiple events in neurogenesis and function in partially overlapping regions in the ventral nerve cord.
      • TALE homeodomain genes ceh-20 and unc-62 are required with lin-39 to specify serotonergic fate in male ventral cord neurons.
      • unc-3 prevents inappropriate serotonergic specification in both males and hermaphrodites.
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      c-Met inhibition in a HOXA9/Meis1 model of CN-AML (pages 172–181)

      Nuala M. Mulgrew, Laura M.J. Kettyle, Joanne M. Ramsey, Susan Cull, Laura J. Smyth, Danielle M. Mervyn, Janet J. Bijl and Alexander Thompson

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24070

      Key Findings

      • Altered gene, miR and protein expression in a HOXA9/Meis1 model of CN-AML
      • Identification and Molecular targeting of key pathways in CN-AML
      • c-Met inhibitor SU11274 demonstrates anti-leukemic activity in human and mouse AML cells
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      “Self-regulation,” a new facet of Hox genes' function (pages 182–191)

      Rushikesh Sheth, Maria Félix Bastida, Marie Kmita and Marian Ros

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24019

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      Distinct genetic requirements for BX-C-mediated specification of abdominal denticles (pages 192–200)

      Nagraj Sambrani, Jacques Pradel and Yacine Graba

      Article first published online: 28 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24081

      Key Findings

      • Ubx and AbdA doesnot require Exd, Wg and Hh function for specifying abdominal type denticles.
      • Exd, Wg and Hh are required for AbdB mediated Abdominal denticles specification.
      • The results from this study suggests the idea of employing different molecular mechanisms by distinct Hox proteins for achieving a similar function.

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