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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 243 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 243, Issue 2

Pages C1–C1, 201–356

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    4. Reviews - A Peer review form
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    4. Reviews - A Peer review form
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mechanisms of muscle growth and atrophy in mammals and Drosophila (pages 201–215)

      Rosanna Piccirillo, Fabio Demontis, Norbert Perrimon and Alfred L. Goldberg

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24036

      Key Findings

      • Modulation of muscle mass by environmental stimuli and transcription factors during disease states
      • Role of protein synthesis and degradation pathways in muscle atrophy
      • Mammals and Drosophila are useful model organisms to identify the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for muscle growth and atrophy in humans
  3. Reviews - A Peer review form

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    4. Reviews - A Peer review form
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      The chick embryo as an expanding experimental model for cancer and cardiovascular research (pages 216–228)

      Kristin H. Kain, James W.I. Miller, Celestial R. Jones-Paris, Rebecca T. Thomason, John D. Lewis, David M. Bader, Joey V. Barnett and Andries Zijlstra

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24093

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    4. Reviews - A Peer review form
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1) function is necessary for maintaining mammary tissue architecture (pages 229–242)

      Edmund C. Jenkins Jr., Shawon Debnath, Sophia Varriano, Stephen Gundry and Jimmie E. Fata

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24032

      Key Findings

      • NHE1 inhibition causes a rapid loss of mammary branched architecture.
      • NHE1 function is necessary for mammary tissue organization and cellular polarity.
      • NHE1 inhibition decreases E-cadherin expression.
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      Epicardial-derived adrenomedullin drives cardiac hyperplasia during embryogenesis (pages 243–256)

      Sarah E. Wetzel-Strong, Manyu Li, Klara R. Klein, Toshio Nishikimi and Kathleen M. Caron

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24065

      Key Findings

      • Adrenomedullin is a secreted peptide with important functions during embryonic development and cardiovascular disease.
      • Adrenomedullin overexpression in mice was accomplished by gene targeted insertion of a stabilizing element within the endogenous 3′ UTR.
      • Admhi/hi mice show enlarged heart size due to cardiomyocyte hyperplasia during development.
      • Reversal of the cardiac hyperplasia is accomplished by Cre-mediated excision of the genetic stabilizing element in epicardial cells.
      • Epicardial-derived adrenomedullin drives myocyte proliferation during development and thus represents a novel mitogenic factor potentially related to mechanisms of cardiac repair after injury.
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      The receptor-like kinases GSO1 and GSO2 together regulate root growth in arabidopsis through control of cell division and cell fate specification (pages 257–278)

      Adriana Racolta, Anthony C. Bryan and Frans E. Tax

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24066

      Key findings

      • GSO1 and GSO2 are necessary for root growth in Arabidopsis by maintaining proper proliferative activity of the proximal and distal root meristem.
      • GSO1 and GSO2 regulate root epidermal cell identity by controlling the pattern of cell division of stem cells.
      • Growth on metabolizable sugars rescues proliferation defects but not patterning defects of gso1; gso2 double mutants.
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      Bhlhb5 is required for the subtype development of retinal amacrine and bipolar cells in mice (pages 279–289)

      Liang Huang, Fang Hu, Liang Feng, Xiong-Jian Luo, Guoqing Liang, Xiang-Yun Zeng, Jing-Lin Yi and Lin Gan

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24067

      Key Findings

      • Bhlhb5 expression during retinogenesis is not confined to GABAergic amacrine cell and Type 2 OFF cone bipolar cell lineage but also is in other retinal cell lineages.
      • In addition to the changes in GABAergic amacrine and Type 2 OFF cone bipolar cells, loss of Bhlhb5 results in a significant loss of glycinergic amacrine cells.
      • Deletion of Bhlhb5 resulted in the cell fate change of Bhlhb5 lineage cells into cholinergic amacrine cells.
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      Mathematical modelling of digit specification by a sonic hedgehog gradient (pages 290–298)

      Thomas E. Woolley, Ruth E. Baker, Cheryll Tickle, Philip K. Maini and Matthew Towers

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24068

      Key findings

      • A mathematical model based on localised production, diffusion and decay of Shh can specify the identities of the different digits in chick wing and leg.
      • The model predicts that the amount of Shh produced by the polarizing region increases over time.
      • Growth is an integral part of the model.
      • The mathematical model cannot be simply extended to specify the identities of the five digits in the mouse limb.
      • Mechanisms in addition to a simple morphogen gradient are required to specify the identities of five digits.
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      Analysis of three μ1-AP1 subunits during zebrafish development (pages 299–314)

      Giuseppina Gariano, Michela Guarienti, Roberto Bresciani, Giuseppe Borsani, Giulia Carola, Eugenio Monti, Roberta Giuliani, Rita Rezzani, Francesca Bonomini, Augusto Preti, Peter Schu and Daniela Zizioli

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24071

      Key findings

      • Zebrafish genome hosts three genes encoding for μ1-adaptin subunits. μ1A, μ1B evolutionary conserved and the novel μ1C.
      • The μ1C expression pattern largely overlaps with that of μ1A, while μ1B is expressed in epithelial cells.
      • Morpholino approach demonstrates that μ1 adaptin subunits are essential for development.
  5. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    4. Reviews - A Peer review form
    5. Research Articles
    6. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      p35 promotes the differentiation of amacrine cell subtype in the zebrafish retina under the regulation of egr1 (pages 315–323)

      Liyun Zhang, Sylvia Bonilla, Yuqing Zhang and Yuk Fai Leung

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24061

      Key findings

      • p35 knockdown compromised the differentiation of Parv+ but not Islet1+ amacrine cells.
      • The observations were highly similar to that in the Egr 1-knockdown retinas.
      • Gene perturbation analysis showed that p35 expression in the amacrine cell region was under the regulation of egr1.
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      Heterochrony in the regulation of the developing marsupial limb (pages 324–338)

      Keng Yih Chew, Geoffrey Shaw, Hongshi Yu, Andrew J. Pask and Marilyn B. Renfree

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24062

      Key Findings

      • There is high conservation of all genes examined with the mouse and opossum orthologues.
      • The AER in the tammar is more prominent than in the opossum limb.
      • TBX5 expression is only slightly earlier in tammar when compared to the mouse.
      • The faster development of the fore limb compared to that of the hind limb correlates with the early timing of the expression of the key patterning genes in these limbs.
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      Slitrk gene duplication and expression in the developing zebrafish nervous system (pages 339–349)

      Jennifer Round, Brittany Ross, Mark Angel, Kayla Shields and Barbara Lom

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24076

      Key findings

      • Similar to other vertebrates, the zebrafish genome includes slitrks1–6, which are expressed dynamically during development.
      • The zebrafish genome also includes duplications of slitrk3 and slitrk5.
      • Slitrk1, 2, 3a, 3b, 4, 5a, and 6 are expressed in the developing zebrafish nervous system in distinct patterns.
      • Slitrk5b is not expressed in the developing zebrafish.
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      Expression of the de novo DNA methyltransferases (dnmt3dnmt8) during zebrafish lens development (pages 350–356)

      Pawat Seritrakul and Jeffrey M. Gross

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24077

      Key findings

      • Expression of dnmt3-family genes in developing zebrafish eye.
      • Unique and overlapping expression domains in lens epithelium, ciliary marginal zone, and inner retina.
      • Two dnmt3-family transcripts detected in each ocular domain.

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