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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 243 Issue 6

June 2014

Volume 243, Issue 6

Pages C1–C1, 741–851

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Tropomyosin is required for cardiac morphogenesis, myofibril assembly, and formation of adherens junctions in the developing mouse embryo (page C1)

      Caroline R. McKeown, Roberta B. Nowak, David S. Gokhin and Velia M. Fowler

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24048

      Key Findings

      • A function for tropomyosin (TM) in mammalian myofibril assembly and cardiac development was explored via a deletion in the mouse TPM1 gene targeting αTM1, the major striated muscle TM isoform.
      • Mice lacking αTM1 are embryonic lethal at E9.5 due to aberrant myofibril assembly and/or degeneration of partially assembled sarcomeres, leading to a grossly enlarged, misshapen, and non-beating heart with an abnormally thin myocardium and reduced trabeculae.
      • Failure of α-actinin/F-actin adherens belt assembly in both αTM1- and Tmod1-deficient cardiomyocytes identifies a novel αTM1/Tmod1-based pathway stabilizing F-actin at cell–cell junctions.
  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Altered developmental events in the anterior region of the chick forelimb give rise to avian-specific digit loss (pages 741–752)

      Naoki Nomura, Hitoshi Yokoyama and Koji Tamura

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24117

      Key Findings

      • Fate map analysis of chicken limb buds shows that the digit-forming region in the forelimb bud is narrower than that in the hindlimb bud.
      • There are temporal differences in the onset of appearance of the ANZ and in the position of the anterior edge of the AER between the fore- and hindlimb buds.
      • ANZ and AER in the forelimb bud are candidates for altered cell fate, resulting avian-specific digit determination.
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      The minus-end actin capping protein, UNC-94/tropomodulin, regulates development of the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine (pages 753–764)

      Elisabeth Cox-Paulson, Vincent Cannataro, Thomas Gallagher, Corey Hoffman, Gary Mantione, Matthew Mcintosh, Malan Silva, Nicole Vissichelli, Rachel Walker, Jeffrey Simske, Shoichiro Ono and Harold Hoops

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24118

      Key Findings

      • UNC-94 localizes to the intestinal terminal web in C. elegans embryos, where it modulates F-actin levels.
      • The C. elegans intestinal terminal web, like that of mammals, contains non-muscle myosin.
      • UNC-94 supports actomyosin contractility in the intestinal terminal web, which is needed for proper lumen morphogenesis.
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      Eda/Edar signaling guides fin ray formation with preceding osteoblast differentiation, as revealed by analyses of the medaka all-fin less mutant afl (pages 765–777)

      Yuuki Iida, Kenta Hibiya, Keiji Inohaya and Akira Kudo

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24120

      Key findings

      • We established the medaka all-fin less mutant afl.
      • The analyses of afl mutant indicated that Eda/Edar signaling is essential for fin ray formation.
      • In vivo imaging revealed that edar-expressing cells migrated in the direction of fin ray elongation.
  3. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      The protein phosphatase 2A B56γ regulatory subunit is required for heart development (pages 778–790)

      Prajakta Varadkar, Daryl Despres, Matthew Kraman, Julie Lozier, Aditi Phadke, Kanneboyina Nagaraju and Brent Mccright

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24111

      Key findings

      • Mice were created that do not express the B56γ regulatory subunit of PP2A.
      • B56γ is expressed in the nucleus of α-actinin-positive cardiomyocytes.
      • B56γ deficient mice have defects in heart development that include the incomplete formation of the ventricular septum and a reduction in cardiomyocytes.
      • The decrease in cells seen in B56γ-deficient mice is caused by cell death during mid to late in gestation in cardiomyocytes that normally express B56γ.
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      A novel planar polarity gene pepsinogen-like regulates wingless expression in a posttranscriptional manner (pages 791–799)

      Kousuke Mouri, Yutaro Nishino, Masaki Arata, Dongbo Shi, Shin-Ya Horiuchi and Tadashi Uemura

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24112

      Key Findings

      • pepsinogen-like (pcl) is essential for proper formation of planar cell polarity.
      • pcl regulates wingless expression in a posttranscriptional manner.
      • Flamingo protein is less abundant in pcl mutant clones in larval imaginal discs.
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      Tropomyosin is required for cardiac morphogenesis, myofibril assembly, and formation of adherens junctions in the developing mouse embryo (pages 800–817)

      Caroline R. McKeown, Roberta B. Nowak, David S. Gokhin and Velia M. Fowler

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24115

      Key Findings

      • A function for tropomyosin (TM) in mammalian myofibril assembly and cardiac development was explored via a deletion in the mouse TPM1 gene targeting αTM1, the major striated muscle TM isoform.
      • Mice lacking αTM1 are embryonic lethal at E9.5 due to aberrant myofibril assembly and/or degeneration of partially assembled sarcomeres, leading to a grossly enlarged, misshapen, and non-beating heart with an abnormally thin myocardium and reduced trabeculae.
      • Failure of α-actinin/F-actin adherens belt assembly in both αTM1- and Tmod1-deficient cardiomyocytes identifies a novel αTM1/Tmod1-based pathway stabilizing F-actin at cell–cell junctions.
    4. You have free access to this content
      Temporal regulation of Dpp signaling output in the Drosophila wing (pages 818–832)

      David D. O'Keefe, Sean Thomas, Bruce A. Edgar and Laura Buttitta

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24122

      Key Findings

      • In the Drosophila wing, Dpp signaling has distinct transcriptional outputs at larval and pupal stages of development
      • Dpp signaling in the pupal wing regulates genes affecting cell adhesion and the extracellular matrix.
      • Analysis of target genes and transcription factor binding sites reveals potential mechanisms by which downstream targets of Dpp signaling are temporally regulated.
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      Frizzled10 mediates WNT1 and WNT3A signaling in the dorsal spinal cord of the developing chick embryo (pages 833–843)

      Lisa M. Galli, Roeben N. Munji, Susan C. Chapman, Ann Easton, Lydia Li, Ouma Onguka, Joseph S. Ramahi, Rowena Suriben, Linda A. Szabo, Camilla Teng, Baouyen Tran, Rami N. Hannoush and Laura W. Burrus

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24123

      Key Findings

      • The domain of WNT1 and WNT3A expression overlaps with that of FZD10 in the developing spinal cord.
      • The domain in which WNT1 and WNT3A signaling is active coincides with the domain of FZD10 expression in the dorsal spinal cord.
      • In the presence of LRP6, FZD10 promotes signaling of WNT1 and WNT3A via a β-catenin dependent pathway.
      • FZD10 interacts with WNT1 and WNT3A in an in situ proximity ligation assay.
      • Palmitoylation of WNT3A is not an absolute requirement for the interaction of WNT3A with FZD10.
      • FZD10 is required for proliferation in the dorsal spinal cord.
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      R-spondins/Lgrs expression in tooth development (pages 844–851)

      Maiko kawasaki, Thantrira Porntaveetus, Katsushige Kawasaki, Shelly Oommen, Yoko Otsuka-Tanaka, Mitsue Hishinuma, Takato Nomoto, Takeyasu Maeda, Keiyo Takubo, Toshio Suda, Paul T. Sharpe and Atsushi Ohazama

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24124

      Key findings:

      • The role of R-spondin/Lgr signaling in tooth development remains unclear.
      • We first carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of R-spondins and Lgrs, and identified their dynamic spatio-temporal expression in murine odontogenesis.
      • We further examined tooth development in R-spondin2 mutant mice, and although molars and incisors exhibited no significant abnormalities, supernumerary teeth were observed in the diastema.

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