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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 243 Issue 8

August 2014

Volume 243, Issue 8

Pages 965–1053

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Techniques
    5. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Cover Image

      Sara A. Colopy, Dale E. Bjorling, William A. Mulligan and Wade Bushman

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24050

      Cover legend: A population of progenitor cells in the basal and intermediate layers of the murine bladder urothelium contributes to urothelial development and regeneration. Co-staining with Krt5 (green) and Krt20 (red) in the left-hand panels demonstrated loss of the superficial cell layer following bacterial inoculation. Rare Krt20+ superficial cells were identified 1 day post-inoculation. By 3 days post-inoculation, Krt20 staining was present within the majority of the luminal cell layer, indicating renewal of differentiated superficial cells. From Colopy et al, Developmental Dynamics, 243:988–998.

      Read the full article at DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24143

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Techniques
    5. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      An NAD+ biosynthetic pathway enzyme functions cell non-autonomously in C. elegans development (pages 965–976)

      Matt Crook, Melanie R. Mcreynolds, Wenqing Wang and Wendy Hanna-Rose

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24139

      Key Findings

      • PNC-1 expression is not detected in tissues with phenotypes, suggesting non-autonomous function
      • Either the secreted PNC-1a isoform or the intracellular PNC-1b isoform is sufficient to provide function in vivo
      • The secreted PNC-1 isoform contributes to in vivo activity
      • Intracellular and extracellular PNC-1 isoforms function cell non-autonomously in C. elegans development and cell survival.
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      The drosophila Chmp1 protein determines wing cell fate through regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling (pages 977–987)

      Meagan Valentine, Justin Hogan and Simon Collier

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Drosophila Chmp1 is an essential gene that negatively regulates DER signaling in the wing. Loss of Chmp1 causes increased DER signaling, and promotes vein cell fate over intervein cell fate. This is likely a result of its role as an ESCRT component in MVB generation.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Key findings

      • Chmp1 is an essential gene for Drosophila development
      • Chmp1 knockdown in the Drosophila wing causes a fate change from intervein to vein cell, and genetic interactions suggest that Chmp1 negatively regulates DER signaling
      • Chmp1 localizes to the late endosome, compatible with its role in MVB generation.
      • Fly lines were generated that can express wild-type or epitope-tagged Chmp1 under Gal4 control.
      • The Drosophila wing provides a model for investigating the activity of other ESCRT components
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      A population of progenitor cells in the basal and intermediate layers of the murine bladder urothelium contributes to urothelial development and regeneration (pages 988–998)

      Sara A. Colopy, Dale E. Bjorling, William A. Mulligan and Wade Bushman

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24143

      Key findings

      • Homeostatic maintenance and repair of the urothelium have been attributed to proliferation of K5-BCs with subsequent differentiation into intermediate and superficial cells, but there is very little direct evidence to support this concept.
      • The preponderance of evidence supporting this hypothesis comes from observational studies utilizing injury-repair models in which the majority of proliferating urothelial cells have been observed within the basal layer of the urothelium subsequent to injury.
      • We demonstrated that urothelial regeneration following diffuse injury recapitulates the pattern witnessed in urothelial development, relying on robust proliferation of K5-BCs and intermediate cells.
      • Label-retaining cells present within the K5-BC and intermediate cell layers proliferate in response to bacteria-induced injury and are incorporated into the newly developed superficial cell layer.
      • Our data suggest that both the K5-BC and intermediate cell layers contain a population of progenitor cells that contribute to urothelial regeneration after injury.
      • Understanding the location and function of progenitor cells within the bladder urothelium has important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of chronic urothelial disease in people and for developing novel regenerative treatments in this patient population.
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      Transcriptionally regulated cell adhesion network dictates distal tip cell directionality (pages 999–1010)

      Ming-Ching Wong, William P. Kennedy and Jean E. Schwarzbauer

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24146

      Key findings

      • The transcriptional regulators, CBP-1 and LET-607, are required for DTCs to make the second turn back to the midbody.
      • CBP-1 and LET-607 regulate the expression of src-1, tln-1, and pat-2, genes that are also necessary for the second DTC turn.
      • DTC turning is dependent on an integrin/adhesion-related gene network orchestrated by CBP-1 and LET-607.
  3. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Techniques
    5. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Prolonged in vivo imaging of Xenopus laevis (pages 1011–1019)

      Paul W. Hamilton and Jonathan J. Henry

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24136

      Key findings

      • Constant flow of anesthetic solution over Xenopus permits efficient aeration and greatly increases survival time in diluted MS-222.
      • Anesthetic flow permits continuous live imaging of Xenopus for at least 48 hours.
      • Addition of a stable optical window allows for high quality imaging.
      • We demonstrate applications of this technique by imaging hindlimb development for 48 hours, as well as show mitotic division and cell migration obtained from transgenic animals expressing fluorescently tagged proteins
  4. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Techniques
    5. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hox expression in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica (pages 1020–1029)

      Jun Tsuchimoto and Masaaki Yamaguchi

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24135

      Key Findings

      • Nine hox genes are dynamically expressed in the adult rudiment of the sand dollar Peronella japonica.
      • The hox genes are classified into two groups in expression, but hox11/13b belongs to both: one with radial expression around the adult mouth and another with linear expression in the somatocoel.
      • The genes with radial expression developmentally correlate with the morphological novelties of echinoderms and/or sea urchins.
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      The zinc finger gene Fezf2 is required for the development of excitatory neurons in the basolateral complex of the amygdala (pages 1030–1036)

      Chiho Hirata-Fukae and Tsutomu Hirata

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24137

      Key findings

      • The zinc finger gene Fezf2 is expressed in the lateral and basolateral nuclei during development.
      • Fezf2 deficiency leads to abnormal specification of excitatory neurons and aberrant nuclear morphology in the lateral and basolateral nuclei.
      • Defects in the Fezf2-deficient basolateral complex induce cell death by apoptosis soon after birth.
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      Novel domains of expression for orphan receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 in the human and mouse reproductive system (pages 1037–1045)

      Ripla Arora, Eran Altman, Nam D. Tran and Diana J. Laird

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24138

      Key findings

      • Non canonical Wnt signaling receptor Ror2 is expressed in human and mouse germ cells.
      • Ror2 is also expressed in support cells of both male and female mouse gonads.
      • Expression is detected in epithelium of the ductal structures of the gonads and the adult uterus of both mouse and human.
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      Nature and extent of left/right axis defects in TWis/TWis mutant mouse embryos (pages 1046–1053)

      Daniel Concepcion and Virginia E. Papaioannou

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.24144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The T locus affects left/right axis determination through Notch signaling and disruptions in node morphology and cilia number. Mutants have reduced Dll1 expression in the primitive streak and do not express genes of the Nodal signal transduction pathway: Cer2 (green) and Nodal (blue), which are normally asymmetrically expressed, and Gdf1 (red stripes), which is normally bilaterally expressed.

       

       

       

       

       

      Key findings

      • Brachyury mouse mutants cause have left/right axis defects including heterotaxia and heart looping defects.
      • The node is abnormal and has fewer cilia.
      • Nodal signaling pathway components are misregulated.
      • The Notch ligand Dll1 is downregulated in the primitive streak.

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