Olanzapine treatment of anorexia nervosa: A retrospective study

Authors

  • Amanda Malina,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Jill Gaskill,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Claire McConaha,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Guido K. Frank,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Maria LaVia,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Lisa Scholar,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Walter H. Kaye

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 3811 O'Hara Street, Room E-724, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
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Abstract

Background

Recent reports raise the possibility that olanzapine, which commonly causes weight gain in non–eating-disordered subjects, assisted weight gain and mood during refeeding in anorexia nervosa (AN) patients.

Methods

Eighteen AN subjects who engaged in open treatment with olanzapine were retrospectively questioned about their response.

Results

Subjects reported a significant reduction in anxiety, difficulty eating, and core eating disorder symptoms after taking olanzapine.

Discussion

These data lend support to the possibility that olanzapine may be useful in AN patients.

Conclusion

A controlled trial is necessary to prove that olanzapine is efficacious. © 2003 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 33: 234–237, 2003.

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