Test meal intake in obese binge eaters in relation to mood and gender

Authors

  • Allan Geliebter,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, New York Obesity Research Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University - College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Touro College, New York, New York
    • St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center, St. Luke's Division, 1111 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10025
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  • Galia Hassid,

    1. Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, New York Obesity Research Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University - College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Touro College, New York, New York
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  • Sami A. Hashim

    1. Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, New York Obesity Research Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University - College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
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Abstract

Objective

We assessed test meal intake in men and women with and without binge eating disorder (BED) in relation to mood score (Zung scale).

Methods

Eighty-five overweight subjects (24 males and 61 females) participated; 30 subjects with BED and 55 without BED. Following an 8-hr fast, subjects consumed a liquid test meal until extremely full.

Results

BED subjects consumed significantly more (p = .009) of the test meal (1,032 g ± 429) than the non-binge eaters (737 g ± 399). The men ingested more than the women (p = .002). BED subjects also had higher depression scores (p = .01), without differing by gender. However, depression scores were unrelated to test meal intakes (r = −.01).

Discussion

The larger meal intakes of the BED group may be due to the larger stomach capacity previously found in both bulimics and obese subjects. The findings also support the premise that BED, listed in the DSM-IV appendix for further study, is found in a distinct subgroup of overweight individuals. © 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 29: 488–494, 2001.

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