Evaluation of a school-based program designed to improve body image satisfaction, global self-esteem, and eating attitudes and behaviors: A replication study

Authors

  • Gail L. McVey,

    Corresponding author
    1. Community Health Systems Resource Group, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Community Health Systems Resource Group, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 1X8
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ron Davis,

    1. Department of Psychology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stacey Tweed,

    1. Community Health Systems Resource Group, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brian F. Shaw

    1. Community Health Systems Resource Group, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a life-skills promotion program designed to improve body image satisfaction and global self-esteem, while reducing negative eating attitudes and behaviors and feelings of perfectionism, all of which have been identified as predisposing factors to disordered eating.

Method

A total of 258 girls with a mean age of 11.8 years (intervention group = 182 and control group = 76) completed questionnaires before, and 1 week after, the six-session school-based program, and again 6 and 12 months later.

Results

The intervention was successful in improving body image satisfaction and global self-esteem and in reducing dieting attitude scores at postintervention only. The gains were not maintained at the 12-month follow-up.

Discussion

The need to assess the influence of health promotion programs on predisposing risk factors, compared with problem-based outcome measures, is discussed. © 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 36: 1–11, 2004.

Ancillary