SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • body weight;
  • height;
  • adolescent females

Abstract

Objective

The authors investigated predictors of the accuracy of self-reported values of body weight and height in adolescent females.

Method

Self-reported and measured weight and height values were obtained for 683 school students aged 11–18 years. Predictors of accuracy were determined for self-reported weight, height, and body mass index (BMI; based on self-reported values).

Results

Self-reported weight was underestimated. This was most likely for students with higher BMI values and actual weight. Younger, early pubertal and premenarcheal students were most likely to underestimate their height whereas older, postmenarcheal (more than 3 years) students were most likely to overestimate their height. The more exercise reported, the more accurate the height estimation. This translates to a greater underestimation of BMI as adolescents become older, have a longer duration since menarche, and exercise more.

Discussion

When accurate information is required, clinicians should measure height and weight, particularly if the adolescent female is perimenarcheal or appears to differ from population averages for height and weight. © 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 36: 76–82, 2004.