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Keywords:

  • disordered eating;
  • Chinese mothers;
  • Hong Kong

Abstract

Objective:

The current longitudinal study explored the prevalence and psychosocial factors of disordered eating among new Chinese mothers in Hong Kong.

Method:

Self-report questionnaires on bulimic symptoms and pregnancy-related factors were collected at both prenatal and postnatal periods from 131 Chinese women.

Results:

Participants reported significantly more severe disordered eating in the postnatal than in the prenatal period, with percentages being 19.08% and 8.4%, respectively, using the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Results revealed that prenatal disordered eating, weak maternal-fetal attachment, a low level of instrumental spousal support during pregnancy, postnatal depressive symptoms, and a poor mother-infant relationship were significantly related to disordered eating at 6 months postchildbirth.

Conclusion:

Findings suggested that the transition to motherhood is a period of stress that may either precipitate or exacerbate disordered eating. © 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2006.