Etiology of hypercholesterolemia in patients with anorexia nervosa

Authors

  • Rina Ohwada MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    • Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan
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  • Mari Hotta MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    2. Health Services Center; National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Shinichi Oikawa MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Kazue Takano MD, PhD

    1. Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

Objective

Hypercholesterolemia is common in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) despite emaciation. The objective of this study was to clarify the mechanism of hypercholesterolemia in AN.

Method

We measured serum lipids in 39 patients with AN and analyzed serum lipid profiles in the 24 patients in comparison with five age-matched controls.

Results

Mean serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), ketone bodies, apolipoprotein (apo)-A1, B, C2, C3, E, and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity were significantly higher in patients with AN than in controls. No significant difference in serum free fatty acid (FFA) levels was observed between patients with AN and controls. CETP was accelerated in patients with AN with hypercholesterolemia. No correlation was apparent between serum levels of cholesterol and thyroid hormones.

Conclusion

Serum levels of cholesterol, CETP, and apolipoproteins decreased after weight gain, indicating that cholesterol metabolism is accelerated in patients with AN with normal serum levels of FFA. © 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2006

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