Satiety and test meal intake among women with binge eating disorder

Authors

  • Robyn Sysko MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ
    • Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Unit 98, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY, 10032
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  • Michael J. Devlin MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
    2. New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • B. Timothy Walsh MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
    2. New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • Ellen Zimmerli PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Harry R. Kissileff PhD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
    2. New York Obesity Research Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, New York, New York
    3. Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Results of this study were presented, in part, at the annual meeting of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity, November 14–18, 1999, Charleston, South Carolina.

Abstract

Objective:

The purpose of the study was to measure test meal consumption and the changes in hunger and fullness during a test meal in obese individuals with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and normal-weight controls.

Method:

Twelve women with BED, 12 obese control participants, and 12 normal-weight control participants participated in two single-item test meal sessions. In one session participants were instructed to “binge,” and the other eat a normal meal. Participants made ratings of hunger and fullness on visual analog scales after every 75-g increment of food.

Results:

In comparison to obese or normal-weight controls, patients with BED consumed significantly more food to reach a similar level of fullness or hunger.

Conclusion:

Individuals with BED consumed significantly more food and showed blunted changes in hunger and fullness during both the binge and nonbinge meals. These findings suggest that individuals with BED may have disturbances in satiety that in some ways resemble those described among individuals with bulimia nervosa. © 2007 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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