Genetic epidemiology, endophenotypes, and eating disorder classification

Authors

  • Cynthia M Bulik PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    • Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 101 Manning Drive, CB #7160, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7160
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  • Johannes Hebebrand MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Rheinische Kliniken Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
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  • Anna Keski-Rahkonen MD, PhD, MPH,

    1. Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland
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  • Kelly L. Klump PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
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  • Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud MD,

    1. Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • Suzanne E. Mazzeo PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
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  • Tracey D. Wade PhD

    1. School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia
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Abstract

Objective:

To explore how genetic epidemiology has informed the identification of endophenotypes and how endophenotypes may inform future classification of eating disorders.

Method:

Literature review and synthesis.

Results:

Although a number of endo- and subphenotypes have been suggested for eating disorders, few reach the rigorous definitions developed for candidate endophenotypes.

Conclusion:

Further study of endophenotypes and subphenotypes for eating disorders may assist with developing a more homogenous classification system that more closely reflects underlying biological mechanisms, and provides a clearer focus for the development of coherent models and treatments. © 2007 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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