Comparison of face-to-face and internet interventions for body image and eating problems in adult women: An RCT

Authors

  • Susan J. Paxton PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
    • School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Melbourne 3086, Australia
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  • Siân A. McLean BSc(Hons),

    1. School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Emma K. Gollings DPsych,

    1. School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Cathy Faulkner DClinPsych,

    1. School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Eleanor H. Wertheim PhD

    1. School of Psychological Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
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Abstract

Objective:

The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes following an eight-session, small group, therapist-led, intervention for body dissatisfaction, and disordered eating in adult women, delivered either in face-to-face or synchronous, internet mode.

Method:

Community women with high body dissatisfaction and internet access were randomly assigned to either face-to-face delivery (N = 42), internet delivery (N = 37), or delayed treatment control (N = 37). All groups were assessed at baseline and 8–9 weeks later. The intervention groups were reassessed at 6-months follow-up.

Results:

Both intervention groups showed large improvements in body dissatisfaction compared with the delayed treatment control and these improvements were maintained at follow-up. However, posttreatment improvements were greater in the face-to-face than internet intervention.

Conclusion:

In adult women, it is desirable to deliver the body image intervention in a face-to-face mode, but the internet mode is effective and has the potential to increase access to therapy. © 2007 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2007

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