Treatment goal weight in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: Use of BMI percentiles

Authors

  • Neville H. Golden MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Schneider Children's Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York
    • Division of Adolescent Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1174 Castro Street, Suite 250 A, Mountain View, CA 94040
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  • Marc S. Jacobson MD,

    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Schneider Children's Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York
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  • Wendy Meyer Sterling MS RD,

    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Schneider Children's Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York
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  • Stanley Hertz MD

    1. Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Schneider Children's Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York
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Abstract

Objective:

There is a lack of consensus as to how to determine treatment goal weight in the growing adolescent with anorexia nervosa (AN). Resumption of menses (ROM) is an indicator of biological health and weight at ROM can be used as a treatment goal weight. This study determined the BMI percentile for age at which ROM occurs.

Method:

A secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study examining 56 adolescent females with AN, aged 12–19 years, followed every 3 months until ROM. BMI percentiles for age and gender at ROM were determined using the nutrition module of Epi Info 2002.

Results:

At 1-year follow-up, 36 participants (64.3%) resumed menses and 20 (35.7%) remained amenorrheic. Mean BMI percentile at ROM was 27.1 (95% CI = 20.0–34.2). Fifty percent of participants who resumed menses, did so at a BMI percentile between the 14th and 39th percentile.

Conclusion:

A BMI percentile range of 14th–39th percentile can be used to assign a treatment goal weight, with adjustments for prior weight, stage of pubertal development, and anticipated growth. © 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord, 2008

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