Factors associated with improvements in readiness for change: Low vs. normal BMI eating disorders

Authors

  • Josie Geller PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Eating Disorders Program, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    • Josie Geller, Eating Disorders Program, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
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  • Stephanie E. Cassin PhD,

    1. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada
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  • Krista E. Brown BA,

    1. Eating Disorders Program, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
    2. Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • Suja Srikameswaran PhD

    1. Eating Disorders Program, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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Abstract

Objective:

To examine factors associated with improvements in readiness for change as a function of body mass index (BMI) in individuals assessed for eating disorders treatment.

Method:

Participants (n = 128) completed the Readiness and Motivation Interview (RMI) and measures of psychiatric and eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, and self-esteem at baseline and at 5-month follow-up.

Results:

Participants whose readiness for change showed improvements in psychiatric symptom severity, global self-esteem, and in the importance of friendships as a determinant of self-esteem. Only those with a normal baseline BMI (20 kg/m2 or greater) improved in eating disorder symptoms and quality of life, and reported increased importance of personal development and decreased importance of shape and weight as determinants of self-esteem.

Conclusion:

Correlates of readiness differed between low and normal BMI participants, suggesting that weight status may be an important variable to consider in preparing highly ambivalent individuals for treatment. © 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2009

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