Birth outcomes in women with eating disorders in the Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study (MoBa)

Authors

  • Cynthia M. Bulik PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    • Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 101 Manning Drive, CB #7160, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7160
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  • Ann Von Holle MS,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Anna Maria Siega-Riz PhD, RD,

    1. Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Leila Torgersen PhD,

    1. Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
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  • Kari Kveim Lie MD,

    1. Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
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  • Robert M. Hamer PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Cecilie Knoph Berg MA,

    1. Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
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  • Patrick Sullivan MD, FRANZCP,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud MD

    1. Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway
    3. Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, New York
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Abstract

Objective

We explored the impact of eating disorders on birth outcomes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

Method

Of 35,929 pregnant women, 35 reported broad anorexia nervosa (AN), 304 bulimia nervosa (BN), 1,812 binge eating disorder (BED), and 36 EDNOS-purging type (EDNOS-P) in the six months before or during pregnancy. The referent comprised 33,742 women with no eating disorder.

Results

Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was lower in AN and higher in BED than the referent. AN, BN, and BED mothers reported greater gestational weight gain, and smoking was elevated in all eating disorder groups. BED mothers had higher birth weight babies, lower risk of small for gestational age, and higher risk of large for gestational age and cesarean section than the referent. Pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain attenuated the effects.

Conclusion

BED influences birth outcomes either directly or via higher maternal weight and gestational weight gain. The absence of differences in AN and EDNOS-P may reflect small numbers and lesser severity in population samples. Adequate gestational weight gain in AN may mitigate against adverse birth outcomes. Detecting eating disorders in pregnancy could identify modifiable factors (e.g., high gestational weight gain, binge eating, and smoking) that influence birth outcomes. © 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2009

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