Restraint, hunger, and disinhibition following treatment for binge-eating disorder

Authors

  • Kristina A. Downe MS,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
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  • Juli A. Goldfein PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
    2. Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York
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  • Michael J. Devlin MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
    2. Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York
    • New York State Psychiatric Institute, Unit 116, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10032
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Abstract

Objective:

To examine changes in total, flexible and rigid restraint, hunger, and disinhibition in obese individuals with Binge-Eating Disorder (BED), and assess whether these variables are associated with binge abstinence at post-treatment and during two-year follow-up.

Method:

A total of 116 obese individuals with BED were randomized to a 20-week treatment trial plus two-year follow-up. Using the Eating Inventory (EI), we assessed these factors at pretreatment, post-treatment, and follow-up time-points and examined their relationship to binge abstinence at post-treatment, 12- and 24-month follow-up.

Results:

Low disinhibition and high-total restraint are associated with post-treatment binge abstinence. There are no significant relationships between post-treatment EI variables and binge abstinence at 12- and 24-month follow-up.

Discussion:

Reducing disinhibition as well as increasing EI dietary restraint during BED treatment may be important for short-term success. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2009

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