Psychometric properties of the clinical impairment assessment: Norms for young adult women

Authors

  • Deborah L. Reas PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Regional Eating Disorders Service (RASP), Psychiatric Division, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    • Regional Eating Disorders Service (RASP), Psychiatric Division, Ullevål University Hospital, Building 37, Kirkeveien 166, N-0407 Oslo, Norway
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  • Øyvind Rø MD, PhD,

    1. Modum Bad, Research Institute, Vikersund, Norway
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  • Hilde Kapstad BA,

    1. Regional Eating Disorders Service (RASP), Psychiatric Division, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
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  • Bryan Lask MD

    1. Regional Eating Disorders Service (RASP), Psychiatric Division, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    2. Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, United Kingdom
    3. Huntercombe Hospitals Group, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Objective:

This study aimed to investigate the initial psychometric properties and to establish norms for the Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA v. 3.0) among a nonclinical sample of young adult women.

Method:

The CIA is a brief, 16-item self-report measure designed to assess psychosocial impairment due to eating disorder features over the past 28 days. We administered the CIA and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q v. 6.0) to 438 university women (mean age = 25 years).

Results:

Participants' mean global CIA score was 6.4 (SD = 7.5; range 0–40). Acceptable levels of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and 1-week test-retest reliability were observed. Significant correlations were found between the CIA and the EDE-Q total and subscale scores (Spearman rhos = 0.58–0.79), indicating that greater levels of impairment were associated with higher levels of eating disorder psychopathology.

Discussion:

Results demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties of the CIA among a sample of young adult women, suggesting the utility of the CIA to measure impairment due to eating disorder features in nonclinical samples. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2010

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