The factor structure of the eating disorder examination in clinical and community samples

Authors

  • Susan M. Byrne DPhil,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    2. Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia
    3. Centre for Clinical Interventions, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    • School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA, Australia
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  • Karina L. Allen MPsych, PhD,

    1. School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
    2. Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Amy M. Lampard MPsych, PhD Candidate,

    1. School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Emma R. Dove PhD,

    1. School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Anthea Fursland PhD

    1. Centre for Clinical Interventions, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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Abstract

Objective:

To assess the factor structure of the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) in three different samples and to compare the goodness-of-fit of five models of EDE data.

Method:

The EDE was administered to eating disordered (n = 158), treatment-seeking obese (n = 170) and non-eating disordered community-based (n = 329) participants. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare the validity of the original four-factor EDE model with that of three-, two-, and one-factor models.

Results:

None of the tested models provided a “good fit” to the data in any sample, with the exception of a brief one-factor model in the eating disorder group. Estimations of internal consistency, reliability, and validity were superior for the one-, two-, and three-factor models compared to the four-factor model in all samples.

Discussion:

Overall, there was more support for a one-factor model of EDE data than for a multi-factorial model. It may be more appropriate to use Global EDE scores than individual subscale scores for research purposes. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2010

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