Self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation: A function of binge eating behavior

Authors

  • Marney A. White PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208098, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8098
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  • Robin M. Masheb PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Carlos M. Grilo PhD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    2. Department of Psychology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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Abstract

Objective

This study investigated patterns of self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation among overweight individuals with and without binge eating.

Method

Participants were 103 overweight (BMI ≥ 25) community volunteers who completed a battery of questionnaires online. Key items queried smoking cessation history and weight gain in the year following cessation. Participants were classified as nonbinge eating overweight (NBO, n = 56) or binge eating disorder (BED, n = 47).

Results

BED participants were significantly more likely to report weight gain in the year following smoking cessation than NBO participants. After controlling for current BMI, the amount of self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation differed significantly between groups, with the NBO group reporting an average gain of 5.0 kg and the BED group reporting 11.2-kg gain.

Discussion

Since many individuals resume smoking due to cessation-associated weight gain, these findings highlight the need for targeted interventions for overweight individuals particularly those who also binge eat. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2010; 43:572–575

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