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Salience of loss of control for pediatric binge episodes: Does size really matter?

Authors

  • Lauren B. Shomaker PhD,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Marian Tanofsky-Kraff PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
    • Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20814-4799
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  • Camden Elliott MA,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Laura E. Wolkoff BA,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Kelli M. Columbo BS,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Lisa M. Ranzenhofer MA,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology (MPS), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Caroline A. Roza BS,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Susan Z. Yanovski MD,

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, NIDDK, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Jack A. Yanovski MD, PhD

    1. Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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    • J. Yanovski is a commissioned officer in the US Public Health Service, DHHS.


  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The opinions and assertions expressed herein are those of the authors and are not to be construed as reflecting the views of USUHS or the US Department of Defense.

Abstract

Objective

The subjective experience of loss of control (LOC) during eating, independent of overeating, may be a salient marker of disordered eating and risk for overweight in youth. However, few studies have directly tested this notion in an adequately powered sample.

Method

Three-hundred-sixty-seven youth (M ± SD age = 12.7 ± 2.8 y) were categorized as reporting objective binge eating (OBE; 12.5%), subjective binge eating (SBE; 11.4%), objective overeating without LOC (OO; 18.5%), or no episodes (NE; 57.5%). Disordered eating attitudes, general psychopathology, and adiposity were assessed.

Results

Children with OBE and SBE generally did not differ in their disordered eating attitudes, emotional eating, eating in the absence of hunger, depressive and anxiety symptoms, or adiposity. However, both OBE and SBE youth had significantly greater disordered eating attitudes, emotional eating, eating in the absence of hunger, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and adiposity compared to those with OO or NE (ps < .05).

Discussion

For non-treatment-seeking youth, LOC during eating episodes, rather than episode size, appears to be the most salient marker of eating and weight problems. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2010; 43:707–716

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