Feeding and eating disorders in childhood

Authors

  • Rachel Bryant-Waugh DPhil,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom
    2. Behavioral and Brain Sciences Unit, Institute of Child Health, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London WC1N 3JH, United Kingdom
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  • Laura Markham BSc (Hons),

    1. Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom
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  • Richard E. Kreipe MD,

    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong, Rochester, New York
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  • B. Timothy Walsh MD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
    2. New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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Abstract

Objective:

To review the literature related to the current DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for feeding disorder of infancy or early childhood; pica; rumination disorder; and other childhood presentations that are characterized by avoidance of food or restricted food intake, with the purpose of informing options for DSM-V.

Method:

Articles were identified by computerized and manual searches and reviewed to evaluate the evidence supporting possible options for revision of criteria.

Results:

The study of childhood feeding and eating disturbances has been hampered by inconsistencies in classification and use of terminology. Greater clarity around subtypes of feeding and eating problems in children would benefit clinicians and patients alike.

Discussion:

A number of suggestions supported by existing evidence are made that provide clearer descriptions of subtypes to improve clinical utility and to promote research. © 2010 American Psychiatric Association. (Int J Eat Disord 2010)

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