Sodium oxybate in the treatment of binge eating disorder: An open-label, prospective study

Authors

  • Susan L. McElroy MD,

    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Anna I. Guerdjikova PhD, MSW,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
    • Lindner Center of HOPE and Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 4075 Old Western Row Road Mason, Ohio 45040
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  • Erin L. Winstanley PhD,

    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Anne M. O'Melia MD,

    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
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  • Nicole Mori CNP,

    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Paul E. Keck Jr. MD,

    1. Research Institute, Lindner Center of HOPE, Mason, Ohio
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • James I. Hudson MD, ScD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts
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  • Supported by Jazz Pharmaceuticals

Abstract

Objective:

To assess preliminarily the effectiveness of sodium oxybate in binge eating disorder.

Method:

This was an open-label, prospective, 16-week, flexible dose study of sodium oxybate in binge eating disorder. The primary outcome was binge eating episode frequency.

Results:

Twelve individuals received sodium oxybate, 10 completed at least one postbaseline evaluation, and five completed the study. Mean dose at endpoint was 7.1 (2.0) g/day. Sodium oxybate was associated with significant reductions in frequency of binge days and binge episodes, as well as measures of clinical severity, eating pathology, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, food cravings, body mass index, and body weight. Nine participants had remission of binge eating and five lost ≥5% of their baseline weight; all five of the latter participants had remission of binge eating.

Discussion:

In this open-label trial, sodium oxybate was effective in binge eating disorder, but associated with high a discontinuation rate. © 2010 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2011; 44:262–268)

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