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5-HT1A receptor binding is increased after recovery from bulimia nervosa compared to control women and is associated with behavioral inhibition in both groups

Authors

  • Ursula F. Bailer MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Biological Psychiatry, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
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  • Cinnamon S. Bloss PhD,

    1. Scripps Genomic Medicine, Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI), and Scripps Health, La Jolla, California
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  • Guido K. Frank MD,

    1. University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Department of Psychiatry, The Children's Hospital, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Julie C. Price PhD,

    1. University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Carolyn C. Meltzer MD,

    1. Emory School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Neurology, and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Atlanta, Georgia, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Chester A. Mathis PhD,

    1. University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Mark A. Geyer PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
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  • Angela Wagner MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
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  • Carl R. Becker BS,

    1. University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Presbyterian University Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Nicholas J. Schork PhD,

    1. Scripps Genomic Medicine, Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI), and Scripps Health, La Jolla, California
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  • Walter H. Kaye MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
    • UCSD Department of Psychiatry University of California, San Diego, 8950 Villa La Jolla Drive, Suite C - 207, La Jolla, California 92037
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  • Disclosure: Dr. Bailer has received honoraria for presentations from Wyeth. Dr. Kaye has received salary support from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California, San Diego; Research funding for an investigator initiated treatment study from Astra-Zeneca and consulting fees from Lundbeck and Merck. In addition, there are honoraria for presentations from academic institutions and meetings, and compensation for grant review activities from the National Institutes of Health. Over the past 3 years, Dr. Geyer has received compensation from Acadia, Addex, Amgen, Amylin, AstraZeneca, Cenomed, Chakra, Medivation, Omeros, Organon, Sepracor, Takeda, Teva, and Wyeth-Ayerst and holds an equity interest in San Diego Instruments. Dr. Mathis has received royalty payments for licensed technology from GE Healthcare and Neuroptix as well as research grant support from Neuroptix. Dr. Mathis also served as a consultant for Janssen/Elan, Wyeth/Pfizer, and Novartis over the past 3 years. The remaining authors, CS Bloss, GK Frank, JC Price, CC Meltzer, A Wagner, CR Becker, and NJ Schork declare that, except for income received from their primary employers and the aforementioned funding, no further financial support or compensation has been received from any individual or corporate entity over the past 3 years for research or professional service and there are no personal financial holdings that could be perceived as constituting a potential conflict of interest.

Abstract

Objective

Because altered serotonin (5-HT) function appears to persist after recovery from bulimia nervosa (RBN), we investigated the 5-HT1A receptor, which could contribute to regulation of appetite, mood, impulse control, or the response to antidepressants.

Method

Thirteen RBN individuals were compared to 21 healthy control women (CW) using positron emission tomography and [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635 ([11C]WAY).

Results

RBN had a 23–34% elevation of [11C]WAY binding potential (BP)P in subgenual cingulate, mesial temporal, and parietal regions after adjustments for multiple comparisons. For CW, [11C]WAY BPP was related negatively to novelty seeking, whereas for RBN, [11C]WAY BPP was related positively to harm avoidance and negatively related to sensation seeking.

Discussion

Alterations of 5-HT1A receptor function may provide new insight into efficacy of 5-HT medication in BN, as well as symptoms such as the ability to inhibit or self-control the expression of behaviors related to stimulus seeking, aggression, and impulsivity. © 2010 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2011

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