Does the broad categories for the diagnosis of eating disorders (BCD-ED) scheme reduce the frequency of eating disorder not otherwise specified?

Authors

  • Robyn Sysko PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Clinical Therapeutics, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
    • Columbia Center for Eating Disorders, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, New York 10032
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  • B. Timothy Walsh MD

    1. Division of Clinical Therapeutics, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York
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Abstract

Objective:

This study evaluated whether the Broad Categories for the Diagnosis of Eating Disorders (BCD-ED) proposal (Walsh and Sysko, Int J Eat Disord, 42, 754–764, 2009) reduces the number of individuals who receive a DSM-IV eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) diagnosis.

Method:

Individuals calling a tertiary care facility completed a brief telephone interview and were classified into a DSM-IV eating disorder category (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, EDNOS). Subsequently, the proposed DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders and the BCD-ED scheme were also applied.

Results:

A total of 247 individuals with telephone interview data met criteria for an eating disorder, including 97 (39.3%) with an EDNOS. Of patients with an EDNOS diagnosis, 97.6% were reclassified using the BCD-ED scheme.

Discussion:

The BCD-ED scheme has the potential to virtually eliminate the use of DSM-IV EDNOS; however, additional data are needed to document its validity and clinical utility. © 2010 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2010)

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