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The eating disorders examination in adolescent males with anorexia nervosa: How does it compare to adolescent females?

Authors

  • Alison M. Darcy PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
    • Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305
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  • Angela Celio Doyle PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
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  • James Lock MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
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  • Rebecka Peebles MD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Mountain View, California
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  • Peter Doyle PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Daniel Le Grange PhD

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
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Abstract

Objective:

The study aimed to explore the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) for adolescent males with eating disorders (EDs) compared with adolescent females with EDs.

Method:

Data were collected from 48 males and matched on percent median body weight (MBW) and age to 48 females at two sites.

Results:

Adolescent males with anorexia nervosa-type presentation scored significantly lower than matched females on Shape Concern, Weight Concern, and Global score. They also scored lower on a number of individual items.

Discussion:

The EDE has clinical utility with adolescent males with anorexic-type presentation although males' scoring ranges are consistently lower than those from adolescent females with similar clinical presentations. Males scored significantly lower on a number of items representing core symptoms such as desire to lose weight. More research is needed to gain a better understanding of the experience of adolescent males with EDs, particularly in relation to the nature of shape concern. © 2011 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012)

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