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Immunogenicity and safety of H1N1 vaccination in anorexia nervosa—Results from a pilot study

Authors

  • Arne Zastrow MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
    • Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Paul Schnitzler MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Infectious Diseases, Virology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 324, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Isabella Eckerle MD,

    1. Section Clinical Tropical Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 324, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Wolfgang Herzog MD, PhD,

    1. Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Hans-Christoph Friederich MD, PhD

    1. Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Drs. Friederich, Zastrow, Eckerle, and Herzog have reported neither potential conflicts of interest nor any types of commercial or financial involvements.

Abstract

Objective:

In anorexia nervosa (AN) patients immunologic alterations are known, although their clinical significance remains a matter of debate. Currently, no recommendation can be given on the safety and immunogenicity of indicated vaccinations in this malnourished population.

Method:

In this exploratory study, 10 AN patients' (eight female, two male, mean age 31.1 years, SD 16.3 years; mean BMI 14.8 kg/m2, SD 1.6 kg/m2) antibody levels against H1N1 influenza were measured before vaccination, and were followed-up for two and three weeks after vaccination. They were compared with the immunological response in normal weight population, as reported in the literature. Clinical and socio-demographical data were collected.

Results:

In the AN group, H1N1 vaccination showed to be sufficiently immunogenic and safe, comparable to published data of normal weight population.

Discussion:

The findings provide preliminary evidence that vaccination seems recommendable even in extremely underweight AN patients. Further studies are needed to corroborate the present findings. © 2011 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012)

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