Comorbidity of partial and subthreshold ptsd among men and women with eating disorders in the national comorbidity survey-replication study

Authors

  • Karen S. Mitchell PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Women's Health Sciences Division, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    • VA Boston Healthcare System, 150 S. Huntington Ave. (116B-3), Boston, MA 02130

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  • Suzanne E. Mazzeo PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
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  • Michelle R. Schlesinger BA,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Timothy D. Brewerton MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Brian N. Smith PhD

    1. National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Women's Health Sciences Division, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

Objective:

The comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and eating disorders (EDs) is high among women but has been understudied in men. Little is known about the association between partial or subthreshold PTSD and EDs among women or men.

Method:

This study included PTSD and ED data from male (n = 2,382) and female (n = 3,310) National Comorbidity Survey-Replication study participants.

Results:

The vast majority of women and men with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED) reported a history of interpersonal trauma. Rates of PTSD were significantly higher among women and men with BN and BED. Subthreshold PTSD was more prevalent than threshold PTSD among women with BN and women and men with BED.

Discussion:

Interpersonal forms of trauma, PTSD, and subthreshold/partial PTSD, were prevalent among men and women with EDs. Findings highlight the importance of assessing for trauma and PTSD in ED patients. © 2011 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012)

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