Ophthalmic changes in severe anorexia nervosa: A case series

Authors

  • Jennifer L. Gaudiani MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado
    • 777 Bannock St, MC 4000, Denver, CO 80204
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  • Jon M. Braverman MD,

    1. Division of Ophthalmology, Denver Health, Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado
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  • Margherita Mascolo MD,

    1. ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado
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  • Philip S. Mehler MD, CEDS, FAED

    1. ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado
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Abstract

Objective:

We describe the diagnosis and management of lagophthalmos, or failure of eyelid closure, in five patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) who complained of dry, irritated eyes and photophobia.

Method:

Five patients with these findings are described retrospectively.

Results:

Examination revealed lagopthalmos in the setting of ptosis and enophthalmos, with multiple other starvation-mediated medical complications.

Discussion:

These eye findings, as complications of AN, have not been described in the literature. With careful protective measures, initiation of nutritional rehabilitation, and intensively monitored early refeeding, these patients' ocular abnormalities and associated symptoms resolved completely. Recognition of this pathology and appropriate management can prevent long-term morbidity in the form of permanent loss of visual acuity due to corneal abrasions and improve the outcomes for these patients with severe AN. © 2012 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2012.

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