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Accuracy of self-reported energy intake in weight-restored patients with anorexia nervosa compared with obese and normal weight individuals

Authors

  • Janet E. Schebendach PhD, RD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    • New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032
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  • Kathleen J. Porter MS, RD,

    1. Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • Carla Wolper EdD, RD,

    1. Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • B. Timothy Walsh MD,

    1. Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • Laurel E.S. Mayer MD

    1. Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
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  • Supported by the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research; Clinical Trials Pilot Award; the Irving Scholars Program at Columbia University; AstraZeneca.

Abstract

Objective:

To compare self-reported and measured energy intake in weight-restored patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), weight-stable obese individuals (OB), and normal weight controls (NC).

Method:

Forty participants (18 AN, 10 OB, and 12 NC) in a laboratory meal study simultaneously completed a prospective food record.

Results:

AN patients significantly (p = .018) over-reported energy intake (16%, 50 kcal) and Bland-Altman (B-A) analysis indicated bias toward over-reporting at increasing levels of intake. OB participants significantly (p = .016) under-reported intake (19%, 160 kcal) and B-A analysis indicated bias toward under-reporting at increasing levels of intake. In NC participants, NS (p = .752) difference between reported and measured intake was found and B-A analysis indicated good agreement between methods at all intake levels.

Discussion:

Self-reported intake should be cautiously interpreted in AN and OB. Future studies are warranted to determine if over-reporting is related to poor outcome and relapse in AN, or under-reporting interferes with weight loss efforts in OB. © 2012 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012)

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