Night eating in obese treatment-seeking hispanic patients with and without binge eating disorder

Authors

  • Carlos M. Grilo PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 301 Cedar St., 2nd Floor, New Haven, CT 06519
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    • Dr. Grilo reports that he receives royalties from Guilford Press and Taylor and Francis Books (for academic books).

  • Vanessa A. Milsom PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Peter T. Morgan PhD, MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Marney A. White PhD, MS

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
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Abstract

Objective:

To examine the frequency of night eating (NE) and its relation to binge eating disorder (BED), eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and metabolic variables in treatment-seeking obese Hispanic men and women.

Method:

A consecutive series of 79 obese monolingual Spanish-speaking-only Hispanic patients with BED (N = 40) and without BED (N = 39) were reliably assessed by bilingual research-clinicians using Spanish-language versions of semistructured interviews and measures.

Results:

Overall, 38% (N = 30) of the 79 patients reported regular NE (≥4 days/month). NE and BED were significantly associated; 70% (21/30) of NE versus 18% (9/49) of non-NE had BED. Patients with NE reported greater frequency of binge-eating and higher levels of eating-disorder psychopathology and depression than non-NE patients; group differences in eating disorder psychopathology and depression levels persisted after controlling for BED status. The NE and non-NE groups did not differ significantly in BMI or metabolic variables.

Discussion:

In obese treatment-seeking Hispanic patients, NE and BED were significantly associated and NE was associated with heightened eating-disorder psychopathology and depression even after controlling for BED status. © 2012 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012; 45:787–791)

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