Assessment of thought–shape fusion: Initial validation of a short version of the trait thought–shape fusion scale

Authors


  • Supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Program (JSC).

Abstract

Objective:

Thought–shape fusion (TSF) is a cognitive distortion that has been linked to eating pathology. Two studies were conducted to further explore this phenomenon and to establish the psychometric properties of a French short version of the TSF scale.

Method:

In Study 1, students (n = 284) completed questionnaires assessing TSF and related psychopathology. In Study 2, the responses of women with eating disorders (n = 22) and women with no history of an eating disorder (n = 23) were compared.

Results:

The French short version of the TSF scale has a unifactorial structure, with convergent validity with measures of eating pathology, and good internal consistency. Depression, eating pathology, body dissatisfaction, and thought-action fusion emerged as predictors of TSF. Individuals with eating disorders have higher TSF, and more clinically relevant food-related thoughts than do women with no history of an eating disorder.

Discussion:

This research suggests that the shortened TSF scale can suitably measure this construct, and provides support for the notion that TSF is associated with eating pathology. © 2012 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2013)

Ancillary