Eating patterns in youth with and without loss of control eating

Authors

  • Brittany E. Matheson BS,

    1. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Marian Tanofsky-Kraff PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Associate Professor, Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, USUHS, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814
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  • Sarah Shafer-Berger PhD,

    1. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Nicole M. Sedaka BS,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Mira Mooreville BA,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Samantha A. Reina BA,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Anna Vannucci MS,

    1. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Lauren B. Shomaker PhD,

    1. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Susan Z. Yanovski MD,

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Jack A. Yanovski MD, PhD

    1. Section on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Portions of this manuscript were presented at the 2012 International Conference on Eating Disorders, Austin, Texas.

  • Published 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a U.S. Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.

Abstract

Objective:

To compare the characteristic meal patterns of adolescents with and without loss of control (LOC) eating episodes.

Method:

The Eating Disorder Examination was administered to assess self-reported LOC and frequency of meals consumed in an aggregated sample of 574 youths (12–17 years; 66.6% female; 51.2% Caucasian; BMI-z: 1.38 ± 1.11), among whom 227 (39.6%) reported LOC eating.

Results:

Compared to those without LOC, youth with LOC were less likely to consume lunch and evening meals (p's < .05), but more likely to consume morning, afternoon, and nocturnal snacks (p's ≤ .05), accounting for age, sex, race, socio-economic status, BMI-z, and treatment-seeking status.

Discussion:

Adolescents with reported LOC eating appear to engage in different meal patterns compared to youth without LOC, and adults with binge eating. Further research is needed to determine whether the meal patterns that characterize adolescents with LOC play a role in worsening disordered eating and/or excessive weight gain. Published 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2012)

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