Sex differences in health-related quality of life impairment associated with eating disorder features: A general population study

Authors

  • Deborah Mitchison BPsych (Hons), MSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Jonathan Mond PhD, MPH,

    1. Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Orange, New South Wales, Australia
    2. School of Sociology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
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  • Shameran Slewa-Younan PhD, BPsych(Hons), BArts Psych,

    1. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Phillipa Hay DPhil, MD, MBChB

    1. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    3. Centre for Health Research University of Western Sydney
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  • Supported by James Cook University and the University of Western Sydney.

Abstract

Objective:

To determine sex differences in the prevalence and impact of specific eating disorder features on health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

Method:

A general population sample of men (n = 1,479) and women (n = 1,555) completed interviews that assessed HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form, SF-36), and current regular occurrence of binge eating, extreme dietary restriction, purging, and overevaluation of weight or shape.

Results:

Men constituted a substantial minority (23–41%) of participants reporting eating disorder features. Objective binge eating had a greater impact on mental health impairment in men versus women, whereas the overevaluation of weight or shape had a greater impact on general and mental health impairment in women compared with men.

Discussion:

Eating disorder features that impact on HRQoL are now common in men; however, the impact of specific features may differ between sexes. © 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2013)

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