Get access

Severely elevated transaminases in an adolescent male with anorexia nervosa

Authors

  • Ryan W. Smith BASc, MSc, MB BCh BAO,

    1. Department of General Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chana Korenblum BSc (Hons), MD,

    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kunal Thacker MD, FRACP,

    1. Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Herbert Joey Bonifacio MD, FRCPC, MSc, MPH,

    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tanja Gonska MD, FRCP,

    1. Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Debra K. Katzman MD, FRCPC

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Correspondence to: Debra K. Katzman, MD, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto Ontario, M5G 1X8 Canada. E-mail: debra.katzman@sickkids.ca

    Search for more papers by this author

  • Conflict of Interest: Royalties from Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins (DKK).

  • This article was published online on 23 July 2013. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate that both have been corrected on 2 August 2013.

ABSTRACT

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious disorder that is associated with numerous medical complications and affects both females and males. Severely elevated transaminases have been reported in adult and younger females. We report the first case of elevated transaminases in an adolescent male with AN. The pathophysiologic mechanism of severely elevated serum transaminases observed in malnourished adolescent males with AN is complex and appears to be multifactorial. We present the first case of an adolescent male with AN who developed severely elevated serum transaminases that normalized with improved nutrition and weight gain. Liver injury in patients with AN is a complex medical complication that appears to be multifactorial in origin. In this case, starvation-induced autophagy in the human liver was considered one of the most likely mechanisms to explain hepatocytic injury in this patient. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2013; 46:751–754)

Ancillary