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Examining associations between adolescent binge eating and binge eating in parents and friends

Authors

  • Andrea B. Goldschmidt PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
    • Correspondence to: Andrea B. Goldschmidt, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 3077, Chicago, IL 60637. E-mail: goldschmidta@uchicago.edu

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  • Melanie M. Wall PhD,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Tse-Hwei J. Choo MS,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Meg Bruening PhD, MPH, RD,

    1. Nutrition Program, School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona
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  • Marla E. Eisenberg ScD, MPH,

    1. Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    2. Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Dianne Neumark-Sztainer PhD, MPH, RD

    1. Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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ABSTRACT

Objective

Binge eating is prevalent among adolescents, but little is known about how parents and friends may influence such behaviors. This study examined associations between adolescent binge eating behaviors, and similar behaviors in their parents and friends.

Method

Participants were 2,770 target adolescent boys and girls who had at least one friend and/or parent who also participated. Logistic regression, stratified by gender, examined associations between parents' and friends' self-reported binge eating, and similar behaviors in target adolescents.

Results

Girls' binge eating was associated with their male friends' (odds ratio = 2.33; p = 0.03) and fathers' binge eating (odds ratio = 3.38; p = 0.02), but not with their female friends' or mothers' binge eating (p > 0.05). For boys, binge eating was not associated with parents' or friends' behavior.

Discussion

Adolescent girls' binge eating is associated with similar behaviors in their other-sex parents and friends. Results should be replicated, and mechanisms explaining this relation should be further explored. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014; 47:325–328)

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