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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 3, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–196

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. List of Reviewers
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.478

  2. List of Reviewers

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. List of Reviewers
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      2011–2012 Reviewers (pages 1–3)

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.479

  3. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. List of Reviewers
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex (pages 1–17)

      Rebecca C. Jones, Dorothy A. Steane, Martyn Lavery, René E. Vaillancourt and Brad M. Potts

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.421

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      Forest trees frequently form species complexes, complicating taxonomic classification, and gene pool management. Here, we resolve the patterns of genetic variation in the ecologically and economically significant Eucalyptus globulus species complex, and the evolutionary processes that have shaped this variation. We identify a cryptic genetic entity of diverse morphology, and show that geography, rather than morphology, is the best predictor of overall genetic affinities within the complex.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular insights into the historic demography of bowhead whales: understanding the evolutionary basis of contemporary management practices (pages 18–37)

      C. D. Phillips, J. I. Hoffman, J. C. George, R. S. Suydam, R. M. Huebinger, J. C. Patton and J. W. Bickham

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.374

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      This study reports on a demographic reconstruction of the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) using multiple genetic markers. The bowhead is a large and long-lived marine mammal species that has been hunted by Inuit communities for many centuries. A dynamic demographic history is reported in which connections between life-history characteristics and ecosystem variability over time are implicated as major demographic determinants, which provides deep historic context to current management strategies.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Degraded Environments Alter Prey Risk Assessment (pages 38–47)

      Oona M. Lönnstedt, Mark I. McCormick and Douglas P. Chivers

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.388

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      Elevated water temperatures, a decrease in ocean pH, and an increasing prevalence of severe storms have lead to bleaching and death of the hard corals that underpin coral reef ecosystems. As coral cover declines, fish diversity and abundance declines. How degradation of coral reefs affects behavior of reef inhabitants is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that risk assessment behaviors of prey are severely affected by coral degradation.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Spatial genetic analysis reveals high connectivity of tiger (Panthera tigris) populations in the Satpura–Maikal landscape of Central India (pages 48–60)

      Sandeep Sharma, Trishna Dutta, Jesús E. Maldonado, Thomas C. Wood, Hemendra Singh Panwar and John Seidensticker

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.432

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      The Satpura–Maikal landscape is a global-priority Tiger Conservation Landscape (TCL) that supports 12% of India's tiger population and comprises 13% of tiger habitat in India. Here, we present the findings of our study of the spatial genetic structure and connectivity of tiger populations in Satpura–Maikal landscape of central India. We found that this tiger meta-population has high genetic variation and very low genetic subdivision due to forest connectivity and high gene flow. However, infrastructural development and exploitation of natural resources poses a threat to the survival of this meta-population.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The genetic basis of female multiple mating in a polyandrous livebearing fish (pages 61–66)

      Jonathan P. Evans and Clelia Gasparini

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.435

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      We present quantitative genetic analyses of female multiple mating (FMM) in guppies to evaluate current theories proposed to explain the evolution of polyandry. Like several recent studies, notably on insects, we report limited additive genetic variance and correspondingly low heritability in FMM, thus suggesting that FMM has limited evolutionary potential. Nevertheless, we point to caveats and potential improvements in design that may yield improved estimates in FMM for quantitative genetic analyses.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Climate and landscape drivers of tree decline in a Mediterranean ecoregion (pages 67–79)

      Niels C. Brouwers, Jack Mercer, Tom Lyons, Pieter Poot, Erik Veneklaas and Giles Hardy

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.437

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      This research shows the negative impact of climate change on the health of an endemic tree species in the fragmented landscape of Southwest Western Australia. The climatic trend of increasing temperatures and decreasing rainfall in this Mediterranean ecoregion is likely to affect species more broadly, indicating the need for monitoring and conservation management.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic diversity of North American captive-born gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (pages 80–88)

      Noah D. Simons, Ronald S. Wagner and Joseph G. Lorenz

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.422

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      As wild gorilla populations continue to decline, management of captive populations represents an important component to the long-term conservation of the species. Here we investigated levels of genetic diversity in captive-born North American gorillas compared to wild populations. We found that management protocols have been effective in maintaining high levels of genetic diversity compared to wild populations.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Evolution of population genetic structure of the British roe deer by natural and anthropogenic processes (Capreolus capreolus) (pages 89–102)

      Karis H. Baker and A. Rus Hoelzel

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.430

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      This study explores the relationship between animal behavior, historical processes, and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate population structure and ultimately promote speciation. In particular, an assessment comparing surviving indigenous roe deer populations with those impacted by bottlenecks and introductions provides inference on the relative importance of natural processes associated with dispersal behavior, and stochastic processes. We found that apparently natural processes of short-range population founding generated a pattern of population structure similar to that seen in a region impacted by stochastic events.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Indiana bat summer maternity distribution: effects of current and future climates (pages 103–114)

      Susan C. Loeb and Eric A. Winters

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.440

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      Our objectives were to determine the climatic and topographic (i.e., elevation) factors associated with Indiana bat maternity range and forecast changes in the overall amount and distribution of the maternity range under various carbon emission scenarios and global circulation models (GCM). Average maximum temperature across the maternity season was the most influential variable explaining the current distribution of Indiana bat maternity colonies. The areal extent of Indiana bat maternity colonies was forecasted to decline and the distribution was forecasted to shift from the Midwestern US to the northeastern US and southern Appalachians.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Phosphogenesis in the 2460 and 2728 million-year-old banded iron formations as evidence for biological cycling of phosphate in the early biosphere (pages 115–125)

      Yi-Liang Li, Si Sun and Lung S. Chan

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.443

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      The Archean Phosphorus Crisis hypothesizes that the precipitation of ferric oxihydroxide might have significantly removed phosphorus from the pre-1.9 billion-year-old oceans that resulted in a primary productivity of the early marine ecosystem only equals to 25% or less of the modern marine ecosystem. We observed the primary precipitation of phosphate in banded iron formations may represent the mineralization of phosphorus from the localized phytoplankton blooms and suggest a biologically controlled, rather than geochemically controlled cycling of phosphorus.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Deep sympatric mtDNA divergence in the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) (pages 126–144)

      Kjersti S. Kvie, Silje Hogner, Leif Aarvik, Jan T. Lifjeld and Arild Johnsen

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.434

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      In this study, we found high levels of mtDNA variation in sympatric populations of Epirrita autumnata. There seems to be an association between mtDNA haplogroups and Wolbachia infection status.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microsatellite and mtDNA analysis of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, from Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories: impacts of historical and contemporary evolutionary forces on Arctic ecosystems (pages 145–161)

      Les N. Harris, Kimberly L. Howland, Matthew W. Kowalchuk, Robert Bajno, Melissa M. Lindsay and Eric B. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.439

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      Panmictic population structure in post-glacial populations of lake trout from the Canadian Arctic.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Neogene origins and implied warmth tolerance of Amazon tree species (pages 162–169)

      Christopher W. Dick, Simon L. Lewis, Mark Maslin and Eldredge Bermingham

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.441

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      Our study provides evidence that widespread Amazon tree species originated in Neogene time frames, in which atmospheric warmth was similar to conditions expected in 2100 under IPCC projections. This implies a broader thermal tolerance of lowland tropical trees than is assumed by models that predict large-scale Amazon forest dieback.

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. List of Reviewers
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Moving forward in global-change ecology: capitalizing on natural variability (pages 170–181)

      Inés Ibáñez, Elise S. Gornish, Lauren Buckley, Diane M. Debinski, Jessica Hellmann, Brian Helmuth, Janneke HilleRisLambers, Andrew M. Latimer, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing and Maria Uriarte

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.433

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      In this manuscript, we describe several underutilized approaches and techniques to address the study of short-term species and ecosystem responses to climate change and highlight why these approaches are particularly valuable for generating information relevant for conservation practices and predictive models. These methods optimize the use of available information and can improve the reliability of our predictions by better exploring the range of potential outcomes of species and ecosystem responses to climate change.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Biological invasions: a field synopsis, systematic review, and database of the literature (pages 182–196)

      Edward Lowry, Emily J. Rollinson, Adam J. Laybourn, Tracy E. Scott, Matthew E. Aiello-Lammens, Sarah M. Gray, James Mickley and Jessica Gurevitch

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.431

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      We employ the techniques of systematic reviewing and field synopses, widely adopted in other scientific disciplines, to describe and categorize a substantial portion of the literature on biological invasions, to better understand what has been studied and what we know, mapping well-studied areas and important gaps. Among other findings, we report that studies of terrestrial plant invasions dominate the literature, and we identify important gaps in areas of theoretical and practical importance.

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