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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 12

October 2013

Volume 3, Issue 12

Pages i–ii, 4045–4289

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have open access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.866

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Individual heterogeneity in black brant survival and recruitment with implications for harvest dynamics (pages 4045–4056)

      Mark S. Lindberg, James S. Sedinger and Jean-Dominique Lebreton

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.767

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      We examined individual heterogeneity in survival and recruitment of female Pacific black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) using frailty models to (1) quantify levels of heterogeneity and examine factors affecting heterogeneity, and (2) model the effects of individual heterogeneity on harvest dynamics through matrix models. Annual survival of individuals marked as goslings was heterogeneous among individuals and year-specific with about 0.23 difference in survival between “high” (0.73) and “low” (0.50) quality individuals at average survival probability. λ was <1.0 under every scenario when harvest rates was >10% and heterogeneity caused as much as +2% difference in growth rates at the highest levels of proportional harvest for low quality individuals and the greatest differences in qualities between classes of individuals, a critical differences for a population with λ near 1.0 such as the brant.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Diet analysis by next-generation sequencing indicates the frequent consumption of introduced plants by the critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon (Columba janthina nitens) in oceanic island habitats (pages 4057–4069)

      Haruko Ando, Suzuki Setsuko, Kazuo Horikoshi, Hajime Suzuki, Shoko Umehara, Miho Inoue-Murayama and Yuji Isagi

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.773

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      We performed diet analysis of critically endangered red-headed wood pigeon using next-generation sequencer. The results indicated frequent use of introduced species, not only native species, by the pigeon.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Testing the genetic predictions of a biogeographical model in a dominant endemic Eastern Pacific coral (Porites panamensis) using a genetic seascape approach (pages 4070–4091)

      Nancy C. Saavedra-Sotelo, Luis E. Calderon-Aguilera, Héctor Reyes-Bonilla, David A. Paz-García, Ramón A. López-Pérez, Amilcar Cupul-Magaña, José A. Cruz-Barraza and Axayácatl Rocha-Olivares

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.734

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      We test genetic patterns of Porites panamensis predicted by a geographically relaxed version of the Abundant Center Hypothesis (rel-ACH) using a genetic seascape approach. Patterns of genetic diversity and structure of nuclear DNA sequences (ribosomal DNA and a single copy Open Reading Frame) and five alloenzymatic loci partially agreed with rel-ACH predictions. Some discrepancies with model expectations may relate to the influence of significant habitat discontinuities in the face of limited dispersal potential. Environmental analyses and niche modeling allowed us to identify temperature, water clarity, and substrate availability as the main factors correlating with patterns of abundance, genetic diversity, and structure.

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      Functional similarity and molecular divergence of a novel reproductive transcriptome in two male-pregnant Syngnathus pipefish species (pages 4092–4108)

      Clayton M. Small, April D. Harlin-Cognato and Adam G. Jones

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.763

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      Genes expressed in reproductive tissues of plants and animals often evolve rapidly, but an assessment of additional taxa and tissues is required to establish firmly the generality of this pattern. We used next generation sequencing to characterize, for the first time, the transcriptome of brooding tissues in two male-pregnant pipefish species. Like gonad-expressed reproductive proteins in other taxa, “male pregnancy genes” appear to have diverged rapidly.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Within-colony feeding selectivity by a corallivorous reef fish: foraging to maximize reward? (pages 4109–4118)

      Rohan M. Brooker, Geoffrey P. Jones and Philip L. Munday

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.778

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      Foraging theory predicts that individuals should choose a prey that maximizes energy rewards relative to the energy expended to access, capture, and consume the prey. However, the relative roles of differences in the nutritive value of foods and costs associated with differences in prey accessibility are not always clear. Here we demonstrate that the corallivorous reef fish, Oxymonacanthus longirostris does not feed uniformly from coral colonies, but is selecting feeding positions with greater polyp accessibility, rather than those that are more nutritious.

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      Strong species-environment feedback shapes plant community assembly along environmental gradients (pages 4119–4128)

      Jiang Jiang and Donald L. DeAngelis

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.784

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      Interplay among strength of ecological engineering abilities, immigration rate, and dispersal was analyzed extensively. We find that the strength of ecological engineering abilities are important factors on community assembly.

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      Daphnia predation on the amphibian chytrid fungus and its impacts on disease risk in tadpoles (pages 4129–4138)

      Catherine L. Searle, Joseph R. Mendelson III, Linda E. Green and Meghan A. Duffy

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.777

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      We tested the ability of two species of freshwater crustacean (Daphnia magna and D. dentifera) to consume zoospores of the amphibian parasite, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and to reduce parasite density in water and infection in tadpoles. In a series of laboratory experiments, we allowed Daphnia to graze in water containing Bd, then exposed tadpoles to the grazed water. Our results show that Daphnia can reduce Bd levels in water and infection in tadpoles, but these effects vary with species, algal concentration and Daphnia density.

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      Drosophila rely on learning while foraging under semi-natural conditions (pages 4139–4148)

      Vukašin Zrelec, Marco Zini, Sandra Guarino, Julien Mermoud, Joël Oppliger, Annabelle Valtat, Valérian Zeender and Tadeusz J. Kawecki

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.783

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      We show that past experience with food of different palatability influences attraction to food odors in fruit flies foraging freely in a greenhouse setting. Furthermore, flies can acquire new information and retain it overnight in this complex and noisy environment. These results support the notion that learning in fruit flies is not a laboratory artifact but may play a role in ecology of Drosophila in nature.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Inferring parturition and neonate survival from movement patterns of female ungulates: a case study using woodland caribou (pages 4149–4160)

      Craig A. DeMars, Marie Auger-Méthé, Ulrike E. Schlägel and Stan Boutin

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.785

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      Extracting information from animal movement data has been an active area of research in ecology yet most analyses have focused on understanding animal space use and the underlying behavioural processes driving spatial patterns. Here, we developed and tested two methods for analysing movement data from female ungulates to infer parturition and neonate survival, both components of individual fitness. Our methods predicted parturition with near certainty and estimated neonate survival with high accuracy (87%) when applied to high-quality data.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Manipulating reproductive effort leads to changes in female reproductive scheduling but not oxidative stress (pages 4161–4171)

      Edith D. Aloise King, Michael Garratt and Robert Brooks

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.786

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      We test whether oxidative stress might represent an important cost of reproductive effort. We performed a two-factor manipulation of reproductive effort in female house mice, manipulating the number of pups in their first brood as well as the chance of them becoming pregnant post-partum. Females with elevated greater reproductive load showed no consistent increase in oxidative damage, despite differences in food consumption, reproductive scheduling, mean offspring mass and a delay in blastocyst implantation of their second litter.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Congruent morphological and genetic differentiation as a signature of range expansion in a fragmented landscape (pages 4172–4182)

      Ronan Ledevin and Virginie Millien

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.787

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      Morphological and genetic differentiation in white-footed mouse populations from forest patches in a fragmented landscape are congruent. This differentiation is occurring in an area located at the most northern edge of the range of the mouse.

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      Forest insects and climate change: long-term trends in herbivore damage (pages 4183–4196)

      Maartje J. Klapwijk, György Csóka, Anikó Hirka and Christer Björkman

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.717

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      The article discusses a 49 years data collection of herbivore damage in the light of the weather and changes in average monthly temperatures. We find that effects of increasing temperatures affect species differentially potentially depending on their life history traits. To our knowledge this is the first study to compare herbivore damage over such a long time period for six species.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Modelling shifts in agroclimate and crop cultivar response under climate change (pages 4197–4214)

      Reimund P. Rötter, Jukka Höhn, Mirek Trnka, Stefan Fronzek, Timothy R. Carter and Helena Kahiluoto

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.782

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      Understanding the interactions of genotypes, management, climate and other environmental variables is instrumental for adaptation of crop production systems to climate change, but these are usually not taken into account in large area assessment approaches. To overcome this shortcoming a novel approach for assessing spatio-temporal agroclimatic dynamics combined with crop simulations was developed and applied to exemplify its benefits using the case of shifting climatic risks to crop production in Finland. Benefits include the capabilities (i) to identify areas where crop yield is currently most prone to climate-induced stresses, (ii) to evaluate how the severity of these stresses is likely to develop in time and space, and, (iii) to appraise and quantify the performance of alternative strategies for adapting crop cultivation to a wide range of climate change projections.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Band reporting rates of waterfowl: does individual heterogeneity bias estimated survival rates? (pages 4215–4220)

      Gary C. White, Line S. Cordes and Todd W. Arnold

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.791

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      Our results indicate that considerable variation in reporting rates does not cause major bias in estimated survival rates of waterfowl, further highlighting the robust nature of dead recovery models that are being used for the management of harvested species.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Degrading habitats and the effect of topographic complexity on risk assessment (pages 4221–4229)

      Mark I. McCormick and Oona M. Lönnstedt

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.793

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      Topographic complexity is a key component of habitats that influences communities by modulating the interactions among individuals that drive population processes such as recruitment, competition, and predation. This study experimentally examined whether topographic habitat complexity affected the way a damselfish assessed predation risk using olfactory, visual, or combined cues. The degree of flexibility that individuals and species have in their ability to adjust the balance of senses used in risk assessment will determine the extent to which organisms will tolerate modifications to their habitat through disturbance.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of inbreeding on fitness-related traits in a small isolated moose population (pages 4230–4242)

      Hallvard Haanes, Stine S. Markussen, Ivar Herfindal, Knut H. Røed, Erling J. Solberg, Morten Heim, Liv Midthjell and Bernt-Erik Sæther

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.819

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      Inbreeding effects on fitness-related traits in moose.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Partitioning of soil phosphorus regulates competition between Vaccinium vitis-idaea and Deschampsia cespitosa (pages 4243–4252)

      Mohd F. Ahmad-Ramli, Thomas Cornulier and David Johnson

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.771

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      Our findings provide direct evidence for preferences towards specific forms of phosphrus (P), and indicate a key role played by organic forms of P. The results support the idea that partitioning for soil P is one factor regulating plant competition, and ultimately, community composition. Our data also highlight the importance of the interplay between P supply and nitrogen acquisition.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Patterns and dynamics of rapid local adaptation and sex in varying habitat types in rotifers (pages 4253–4264)

      Thomas Scheuerl and Claus-Peter Stelzer

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.781

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      We tested the hypothesis that replicated populations can attain rapid local adaptation under two varying laboratory environments. Clonal subpopulations of the cyclically parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus were allowed to adapt to two varying harsh environments. We provide evidence that rotifers rapidly develop local adaptation to high-salt and low-food environments under a selection regime that explicitly favours fast population growth. Higher levels of adaptation in the high-salt populations during the selection phase were accompanied by higher levels of sex.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk (pages 4265–4277)

      Cherie J. Dugal, Floris M. van Beest, Eric Vander Wal and Ryan K. Brook

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.788

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      In this study, we present an analytical approach to quantify high-risk areas for disease transmission based on sex- and age-specific tracking data of nonmigratory elk and hunter-kill sites using resource selection functions and selection ratios. We present a novel application of widely available data to target the distribution of hunters based on host demography and distribution, and map areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. Our disease risk management maps provide a complementary tool that allows managers to precisely evaluate hunter success, which creates opportunities to redirect hunters and improve disease monitoring and control.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Individual differences in migratory behavior shape population genetic structure and microhabitat choice in sympatric blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) (pages 4278–4289)

      Gregor Rolshausen, Gernot Segelbacher, Claudia Hermes, Keith A. Hobson and H. Martin Schaefer

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.825

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      Our study explores a potential mechanism how environmental variation can translate into population genetic structuring in migratory bird populations. We show that individual variation in migratory behavior relates to within-population structure in European blackcaps. We examine and discuss two potential proximate mechanisms that might be involved: arrival times and microhabitat choice.

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