You have full text access to this Open Access content

Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 13

November 2013

Volume 3, Issue 13

Pages i–ii, 4291–4620

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.894

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Differences in boldness are repeatable and heritable in a long-lived marine predator (pages 4291–4299)

      Samantha C. Patrick, Anne Charmantier and Henri Weimerskirch

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.748

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here we demonstrate the repeatability and heritability of boldness in wandering albatross. This has important implications due to the extreme life history strategies this species exhibits and the potential link between the life history tradeoffs and the evolution of personality.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bacterial colonization and extinction on marine aggregates: stochastic model of species presence and abundance (pages 4300–4309)

      Andrew M. Kramer, M. Maille Lyons, Fred C. Dobbs and John M. Drake

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.789

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic aggregates provide a favorable habitat for aquatic microbes, are efficiently filtered by shellfish, and may play a major role in the dynamics of aquatic pathogens. We develop a model for the stochastic dynamics of an “average” pathogen species on such aggregates. Model results suggest that presence and abundance are nonlinearly related to bacterial density and aggregate size and provide useful insight into how species-specific differences in bacterial pathogen traits may alter the effect of aggregates on disease transmission.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Satellite-derived estimations of spatial and seasonal variation in tropospheric carbon dioxide mass over China (pages 4310–4325)

      Yuyue Xu, Changqing Ke, Juanle Wang, Jiulin Sun, Yang Liu, Warwick Harris and Cheng Kou

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.823

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      (A) Annual mean tropospheric CO2 mass (MT, million tonnes) for each province of China and (B) annual mean tropospheric CO2 mass per province area (Gg/km2) in 2010.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A multievent approach to estimating pair fidelity and heterogeneity in state transitions (pages 4326–4338)

      Antica Culina, Shelly Lachish, Roger Pradel, Remi Choquet and Ben C. Sheldon

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We report the development of a novel multievent mark-recapture modelling framework to estimate the rates of pair fidelity, that accounts for heterogeneous recapture probabilities of individuals, and also allows exploration of the fitness consequences of pair fidelity and partner change. We demonstrate its utility of on a 30-year dataset from the great tit population. We shown that pair fidelity is associated with increased survival, and that faithful individuals are more likely to remain faithful in subsequent breeding seasons.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Plant chemical defense allocation constrains evolution of tolerance to community change across a range boundary (pages 4339–4347)

      David H. Siemens and Riston Haugen

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.657

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Because most transplant studies show that areas just across geographic range boundaries are stressful, factors that interfere with the process of adaptation to the stressful environments may contribute to range limit development. In a common garden field experiment set up across a range boundary, we found that plants of Boechera stricta with inherently high levels of glucosinolate toxins were less able to tolerate the stress associated with the change in the neighboring plant community across the range boundary. Higher glucosinolate levels would also be needed for range expansion because attack by generalist insect herbivores increases across the range.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ensemble modeling to predict habitat suitability for a large-scale disturbance specialist (pages 4348–4364)

      Quresh S. Latif, Victoria A. Saab, Jonathan G. Dudley and Jeff P. Hollenbeck

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.790

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To conserve habitat for disturbance specialist species, ecologists must often identify where individuals will likely settle in newly disturbed areas without the benefit of data from those areas. We predicted habitat suitability for nesting Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus), a burned-forest specialist, using ensemble modeling to combine predictions from multiple models and thereby generate predictions robust to uncertainties associated with individual models. Ensemble predictions exhibited two desirable properties: (1) a positive relationship with apparent rates of nest occurrence at calibration locations and (2) declining model agreement outside surveyed environments consistent with our reduced confidence in novel environments.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Predicting grey-sided vole occurrence in northern Sweden at multiple spatial scales (pages 4365–4376)

      Magnus Magnusson, Arvid Bergsten, Frauke Ecke, Örjan Bodin, Lennart Bodin and Birger Hörnfeldt

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.827

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The grey-sided vole (Myodes rufocanus) has declined since the 1970s in forests of northern Sweden. Previous studies suggested that this might partly be caused by reduced focal forest patch size due to clear-cutting. Our results support the importance of large forest patches, but also highlight the importance of high connectivity of forest patches for occurrence of grey-sided voles. Our results further suggest that proximity of stone fields increases habitat quality and enhances the voles' ability to move between nearby forest patches through the matrix.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Coalescent analyses show isolation without migration in two closely related tropical orioles: the case of Icterus graduacauda and Icterus chrysater (pages 4377–4387)

      Nandadevi Cortés-Rodríguez, Frode Jacobsen, Blanca E. Hernandez-Baños, Adolfo G. Navarro-Siguenza, Jeffrey L. Peters and Kevin E. Omland

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.768

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use pf coalescent analyses to study the divergence of two closely related species of orioles found no recent gene flow despite their current geographic distribution. This paper examines on divergence between two closely related oriole species whose distribution in the highlands of SE Mexico is separated by the lowlands of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Icterus graduacauda is found west of the Isthmus and Icterus chrysater is found east of the Isthmus. We performed coalescent analysis of multiple loci using the program Isolation with Migration. We found that these species diverged roughly 300,000 years ago as a result of a vicariant event. In addition, there is no evidence that these two species currently exchange genes despite their recent divergence and their geographic proximity.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hybridization promotes color polymorphism in the aposematic harlequin poison frog, Oophaga histrionica (pages 4388–4400)

      Iliana Medina, Ian J. Wang, Camilo Salazar and Adolfo Amézquita

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.794

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We provide evidence supporting a hybridization scenario between two different lineages of poison-dart frog. This constitutes a novel hypothesis to explain the great amount of polymorphisms present in the Dendrobatid family.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Early growth, dominance acquisition and lifetime reproductive success in male and female cooperative meerkats (pages 4401–4407)

      Sinead English, Elise Huchard, Johanna F. Nielsen and Tim H. Clutton-Brock

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.820

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Theory predicts that the sex with highest variance in reproductive success should be more susceptible to conditions favouring competitive traits, yet few studies have measured these effects in sexually monomorphic species. Here, we show that early growth influences later breeding success in female but not male cooperative meerkats, a sexually monomorphic species with intense female competition. Our results highlight how the link between growth and later fitness reflects the intensity of intrasexual competition and that such processes may only be revealed in studies considering several measures of growth and mass.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular identification of the prey range of the invasive Asian paper wasp (pages 4408–4414)

      Darren F. Ward and Ana Ramón-Laca

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.826

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We determined the prey range of the invasive Asian paper wasp using molecular diagnostics. Nests of the Asian paper wasp were collected, larvae were removed and dissected, and DNA from the gut of the paper wasp larvae was amplified and sequenced with COI. The results greatly extend the prey range of this invasive species.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nucleotide diversity of vernalization and flowering-time-related genes in a germplasm collection of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds. syn. Lolium pratense (Huds.) Darbysh.) (pages 4415–4426)

      Hiroshi Shinozuka, Melanie L. Hand, Noel O. I. Cogan, German C. Spangenberg and John W. Forster

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.828

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Meadow fescue is an important temperate pasture grass. Nucleotide sequence diversity has been determined in genes controlling induction of reproductive development. The resulting haplotype diversity data has been compared with ecogeographical variation within a comprehensive germplasm collection, and the frequencies of differing allelic variants correlated with latitudinal origin for populations distributed across Western Eurasia. Significant differences between populations are interpreted in terms of selection pressures acting on various components of the floral induction system.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parasite predators exhibit a rapid numerical response to increased parasite abundance and reduce transmission to hosts (pages 4427–4438)

      Skylar R. Hopkins, Jennie A. Wyderko, Robert R. Sheehy, Lisa K. Belden and Jeremy M. Wojdak

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.634

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Parasites can be abundant and energy-rich food resources in ecosystems, and predation on free-living parasite stages can reduce parasite transmission. Here we used a series of experiments to investigate how the respective densities of a parasite (Echinostoma trivolvis; Trematoda) and its predator (Chaetogaster limnaei limnaei; Oligochaeta) are important to parasite transmission. Parasite predator populations rapidly increased in response to high parasite abundances, and parasite transmission decreased substantially with increasing predator density.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A hierarchical nest survival model integrating incomplete temporally varying covariates (pages 4439–4447)

      Sarah J. Converse, J. Andrew Royle, Peter H. Adler, Richard P. Urbanek and Jeb A. Barzen

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.822

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hierarchical nest survival model was developed to account for incomplete temporally-varying covariates. Analysis under this model revealed an impact of biting flies on whooping cranes in the reintroduced Eastern Migratory Population.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multilocus analyses indicate a mosaic distribution of hybrid populations in ground squirrels (genus Ictidomys) (pages 4448–4460)

      Cody W. Thompson, Faisal Ali Anwarali Khan, Frederick B. Stangl Jr, Robert J. Baker and Robert D. Bradley

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.755

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome-b (Cytb) and Y-linked structural maintenance of chromosomes (SmcY) genes were combined with 478 nuclear loci obtained from (AFLP) to assess the extent of hybridization and genetic spatial structure of populations in two hybridizing species of ground squirrel (Ictidomys parvidens and I. tridecemlineatus). Based on AFLP analyses of 134 individuals from 28 populations, 10 populations were identified that possessed hybrid individuals. Overall estimates of FST values revealed strong support for population structure in the Cytb dataset; however, analyses of the SmcY gene and the AFLP data indicated ongoing gene flow between species.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Comparative phylogeography of two sympatric beeches in subtropical China: Species-specific geographic mosaic of lineages (pages 4461–4472)

      Zhi-Yong Zhang, Rong Wu, Qun Wang, Zhi-Rong Zhang, Jordi López-Pujol, Deng-Mei Fan and De-Zhu Li

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.829

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A late Miocene origin of Chinese beeches.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Metacommunity structuring in stream networks: roles of dispersal mode, distance type, and regional environmental context (pages 4473–4487)

      Mira Grönroos, Jani Heino, Tadeu Siqueira, Victor L. Landeiro, Juho Kotanen and Luis M. Bini

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We studied three stream macroinvertebrate metacommunities and found that dispersal mode affects metacommunity structuring. Actively dispersing species were more environmentally structured than passively dispersing species. Spatial extent or environmental heterogeneity did not drive the differences among the metacommunities. Our study supports previous findings that species sorting is prevailing in metacommunities.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Colonization of islands in the Mona Passage by endemic dwarf geckoes (genus Sphaerodactylus) reconstructed with mitochondrial phylogeny (pages 4488–4500)

      Alondra M. Díaz-Lameiro, Taras K. Oleksyk, Fernando J. Bird-Picó and Juan Carlos Martínez-Cruzado

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.770

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Parts of two mitochondrial genes were sequenced from several Sphaerodactylus species collected from Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and two small islands located between the formers. A stepwise model of colonization is proposed, wherein S. nicholsi from southwestern Puerto Rico or a very close ancestor gave rise through a founder event to Sphaerodactylus monensis on Mona Island and, in a similar fashion, S. monensis or a very close ancestor on Mona Island gave rise to S. levinsi on Desecheo Island.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction (pages 4501–4517)

      Lee A. Rollins, Angela T. Moles, Serena Lam, Robert Buitenwerf, Joanna M. Buswell, Claire R. Brandenburger, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Knud B. Nielsen, Ellen Couchman, Gordon S. Brown, Fiona J. Thomson, Frank Hemmings, Richard Frankham and William B. Sherwin

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.824

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A review of introduced populations showing evidence of adaptation to their new environments indicated that these introductions retained 81% of the genetic diversity from the native range. Although the two species studied here had exceptionally low native range genetic diversity, introductions of A. populifolia represent a larger percentage loss of genetic diversity than found in any introduction identified in our review. While high genetic diversity may increase the likelihood of invasion success, these species adapted to their new environments with very little neutral genetic diversity, suggesting that even introductions founded by small numbers of individuals have the potential to become invasive.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Deflective and intimidating eyespots: a comparative study of eyespot size and position in Junonia butterflies (pages 4518–4524)

      Ullasa Kodandaramaiah, Patrik Lindenfors and Birgitta S. Tullberg

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We here test hypotheses about the antipredatory role of eyespots in a group of butterflies belonging to the genus Junonia using a comparative approach. We find that larger eyespots tend to be solitary, and we argue that being in a solitary disposition makes them more conspicuous, and hence large and solitary eyespots intimidate predators. We also report that smaller eyespots are found close to the wing margin away from vital body parts, suggesting that smaller eyespots act as decoys deflecting predatory attacks toward less vulnerable areas of the body.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Meta-analysis reveals profound responses of plant traits to glacial CO2 levels (pages 4525–4535)

      A. A. Temme, W. K. Cornwell, J. H. C. Cornelissen and R. Aerts

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.836

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We performed a meta-analysis of low CO2 growth experiments on 34 studies with 54 species. We quantified how plant traits vary at reduced CO2 levels and whether C3 versus C4 and woody versus herbaceous plant species respond differently. At low CO2, plant functioning changed drastically.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Introgressive hybridization in a trophically polymorphic cichlid (pages 4536–4547)

      C. Darrin Hulsey and Francisco J. García-de-León

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.841

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study investigates introgression between the trophically polymorphic cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi and its relative H. cyanoguttatus using a combination of population genetics and species tree analyses. We learned that both H. minckleyi morphotypes contained the H. cyanoguttatus haplotype with roughly equal frequencies. We also reconstructed a species tree of these species using 84 nuclear loci and found all H. minckleyi individuals were supported as distinct from H. cyanoguttatus despite the presence of H. cyanoguttatus mitochondrial haplotypes.

    23. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Projected marine climate change: effects on copepod oxidative status and reproduction (pages 4548–4557)

      Anu Vehmaa, Hedvig Hogfors, Elena Gorokhova, Andreas Brutemark, Towe Holmborn and Jonna Engström-Öst

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.839

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The combined effects of ocean acidification and global warming predicted for year 2100 with toxic cyanobacteria are studied on the calanoid copepod, Acartia bifilosa. As zooplankton are an important link between primary producers and fish, it is crucial to address their responses when predicting effects of climate change on pelagic ecosystems. The found interactive effects of temperature, acidification, and cyanobacteria highlight the importance of testing joint effects of climate-related factors when predicting biological responses.

    24. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Phylogeography of the California sheephead, Semicossyphus pulcher: the role of deep reefs as stepping stones and pathways to antitropicality (pages 4558–4571)

      Marloes Poortvliet, Gary C. Longo, Kimberly Selkoe, Paul H. Barber, Crow White, Jennifer E. Caselle, Alejandro Perez-Matus, Steven D. Gaines and Giacomo Bernardi

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.840

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, we have focused on an antitropical wrasse genus, Semicossyphus, that includes the California sheephead, S. pulcher, and Darwin's sheephead, S. darwini. We show that similar ecological characteristics have played a role in shaping the genetics of divergence both between and within species of sheephead. In particular, our data are consistent with the use of deep-water reefs as stepping stones.

    25. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Combining food web and species distribution models for improved community projections (pages 4572–4583)

      Loïc Pellissier, Rudolf P. Rohr, Charlotte Ndiribe, Jean-Nicolas Pradervand, Nicolas Salamin, Antoine Guisan and Mary Wisz

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.843

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We combine a predictive food web model that can infer the potential interaction links between species, with species distribution models. Using a plant–herbivore (butterfly) interaction, dataset collected in the Swiss Alps and dissected in previous studies, we demonstrate for the first time that this combined approach is able to improve both species distribution and community forecasts. Our combined approach points a promising direction forward to model the spatial variation in entire species interaction networks.

    26. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Patterns of species diversity and phylogenetic structure of vascular plants on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (pages 4584–4595)

      Yujing Yan, Xian Yang and Zhiyao Tang

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.847

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We explored the patterns of species and phylogenetic diversity in relation to climates and habitat heterogeneity based on fine-resolution distribution of ~9000 vascular plant species on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The results showed that species richness and phylogenetic diversity on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau wereregulated by climate, even after the habitat heterogeneity controlled, and environment filtering dominates the assembly of communities on the plateau.

    27. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The genetics of phenotypic plasticity. XII. Temporal and spatial heterogeneity (pages 4596–4609)

      Samuel M. Scheiner

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.792

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To understand why adaptive plasticity is less common than we would expect, we need to explore the complexities of environmental heterogeneity and how it interacts with cue reliability. I consider both temporal and spatial variation separately and in combination, the timing of temporal variation relative to development, the timing of movement relative to selection, and two different patterns of movement: stepping-stone and island. In general, spatial variation more strongly selects for plasticity than temporal variation, and island migration more strongly selects for plasticity than stepping-stone migration.

    28. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The importance of selection at the level of the pair over 25 years in a natural population of birds (pages 4610–4619)

      Mats Björklund and Lars Gustafsson

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.835

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We show that selection at the level of the pair is important in some years using a 25-year long-term data set.

  3. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Modeling shifts in agroclimate and crop cultivar response under climate change (page 4620)

      Reimund P. Rötter, Jukka Höhn, Mirek Trnka, Stefan Fronzek, Timothy R. Carter and Helena Kahiluoto

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.890

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION